The new book Holacracy-The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World is a book that will get anyone in business thinking about how to organize their company.  As a matter of fact, many major companies have embraced Brian Robertson’s Holacracy System including the forward thinking organization Zappos.

In my interview with Brian we take an in-depth look into how to design an organization with this new management model.  Holacracy is a combination of individual accountability, team transparency, and flexible, face-paced tactical meetings to help in creating greater levels of efficiency, adaptability and productive operations.  Holacracy also develops absolute habits of making commitments about when you will deliver a particular project or action.  For instance in tactical meetings you capture next action, but do not attach deadlines or commitment to them.  You might be asking why?  Committing to deadlines has downsides and obscures a more dynamic, reality-based approach.  Brian states that by accepting the next action item in your role, is by definition making the commitment to continuously track the action, and to consciously do the action as soon as it becomes the most important item among your possible actions.

I encourage you to listen, take notes and learn from Brian Robertson a man on a mission to transform how organization run, and how the cultures are transformed.  He has a fascinating approach and one that is worth your investigation of time to understand.  If you want more information about Holacracy you can click here to be directed to his book site, or click here to be directed to Holacracy.org.

I happen to listen to National Public Radio a lot, and I was listening to an interview with Chris Farrell about his new book entitled “Unretirement: How Baby Boomers Are Changing The Way We Think About Work, Community, and the Good Life.”  I was so intrigued that I reached out to Chris and he granted me an interview.

You will find that Chris does not buy into the gloom and doom that most economists believe, the sky is falling– Social Security is going to fail and there’s not enough money.  Chris is quite the contrarian and believes that if we the retirees shift our thinking about retirement, including our mindset or  better yet why retire at all if you are healthy and can still make a contribution to society.

You must understand that this is a controversial topic these days, and it is not because their is a conspiracy to convince the baby boomers to take their retirements at age 70 because the government can’t afford the early retirees and payouts, it is because so many baby boomers are living longer are healthier and want to make a contribution to the world.   We are living longer are more active and have much to contribute to society, communities, organizations–so why not continue to make a difference and work.

Chris makes interesting observation from Peter Drucker in “Unretirement”, that every once in a while society crosses a major divide, and that we are crossing the divide now.  We are making the difficult transition toward a different vision of the elder years.  This vision includes, people working longer, making more contributions to society, working in contract jobs, becoming entrepreneurs and volunteers.  Chris’s book is the roadmap for workers of all ages who want to adapt from the work-then-retire mindset.

I hope you enjoy my interview with Chris Farrell about “Unretirement” If you want to learn more you can go to Chris’s website by clicking here.

 

You might be familiar with all the buzz around something called the “Business Model Canvas”.  There are currently three books in the series which started with “Business Model Generation” then “Business Model You” now a new book ” Value Proposition Design“.  So why the interest from the business communities in this interesting way of developing a business model.  Simply put, it is engaging, inclusive ,compelling and it works.

Authors Alex Osterwalder, Yves Pingeur, Greg Bernarda and Alan Smith are the dynamic team behind the business model canvas.  I recently had the pleasure of having a dialogue with Alex Smith the brains behind the book designs, which I might add are a big reason for the success of the books.

During our dialogue we discuss the key elements in creating a great value for customers, we also get into the steps necessary to create the value proposition canvas: Customer Profile, Value Map and Fit all  extremely important considerations in the developing a any new product design.  Alan and his colleagues refer to gain creators, and pain relievers as one of the most important elements in developing great designs.

While this all might sound simple it is daunting to create a new product, test it and know that you are creating something that is really needed and wanted by your customers.  Developing something in a vacuum is crazy,  where your perception of what will relieve your customers pains is exactly that a perception and not the reality of the situation.  Developing then testing your product is so important, I speak from experience I have developed a few products and testing is so important so you can gain feedback.

Alan and his team have recently released a cloud based software system allowing teams to collaborate on developing a business model canvases, it is called Strategyzer.  In my humble opinion I have never seen software as simple as Strategyzer, providing results in minutes.  If you work with a team and you are in the process of developing a new product or service I would highly recommend checking out this amazing new cloud based software.

I encourage you to listen closely to Alan Smith as he guides the listener to a better understanding of Business Model Canvas and Value Proposition Design.  If you want to just click on the links provided below that will take you to the related websites associated with Value Proposition Design.

Value Proposition Design

Strategyzer

I happen to be listening to a podcast that the Robert Greenleaf Center for Servant Leadership was hosting , and I heard an interview with author Ari Weinzweig the author of a trilogy of books entitled ” A Lapsed Anarchist’s Approach to Managing Ourselves”, “Being a Better Leader” and “Building a Great Business” all in the Lapsed Anarchist’s series. I was so taken by Ari’s approach to how he built and ran his organizations that I invited him to be on Inside Personal Growth. In this interview about his book “Managing Ourselves” Ari and I discuss the 12 Tips for more effective self-management, which are truly gems and so important to learn on our path of self discovery and personal growth. Tip one (1)  is “Get to Know Yourself”, now while this seems simple most of us spend a lifetime going deep into our soul seeking to better understand our best attributes and qualities as well as how to improve the ones that frequently get in the way and don’t serve us as becoming better human beings. The second Tip Ari speaks about is “Honoring Your Emotions.” We all know the line “leave your emotions at the door” when you go to work. As Ari states that is utterly impossible—our emotions go with us wherever we go but we can learn to monitor and manage them so they don’t get in the way of what we are trying to accomplish. The entire list of 12 tips are in his book, as well you can go to his website to learn more. I know that you will receive a lifetime of personal and business wisdom from my interviews with Ari. I highly encourage purchasing Ari’s trilogy of books and to  learning more about his organization Zingerman’s by clicking on the link here. He has also created Zing Train a training organization based in Ann Arbor, MI with a mission to help organizations better serve both their customers and employees. To learn more click here to be directed to the Zing Train website, or click here to be directed to the Zingerman’s Facebook page.

 

 

Cindy WigglesworthWe have all read and heard about the work of Daniel Goldman regarding Emotional Intelligence, but now what I believe could prove to be equally important is the measurement of our  spiritual intelligence.  Author  Cindy Wigglesworth has just published a book entitled “The 21 Skills of Spiritual Intelligence“which  provides insight into our spiritual intelligence.  As part of my inquiry Cindy  allowed me to take the 170 question analysis that she diligently developed over many years. The quiz was quite revealing and is certainly a tool that will be quite useful both personally and in the work environment. (For more information on the click here to be directed to her website.)

Cindy defines spiritual intelligence as “the ability to behave with wisdom and compassion while maintaining inner and outer peace regardless of the situation.” Wow, now thats  a skill set  that most corporations would love to instill in their employees.  Cindy states that “transcending our smaller nature and growing into our full potential as human beings is the most important and fulfilling thing we can do with our lives.  The set of skills that are collectively known as spiritual intelligence are designed to help you become more fully who you are, to continue to grow and develop, and to live with greater consciousness, direction, wisdom and compassion.

Cindy uses her newly defined spiritual intelligence in conjunction with the other identified intelligences, physical, cognitive, emotional intelligence.  When combined and analyzed they become a powerful tool that can assist the management of organizations in defining how employees will best work, inspire and collaborate with one another.  There are 21 skills that have been identified as part of our spiritual intelligence , and those skills have been classified into four (4) quadrants.  Self-Awareness, Universal Awareness, Self Mastery, Social Mastery/Spiritual Presence.  To better understand the spiritual intelligence model I recommend that you click here to be directed to Cindy’s Deep Change website.

I hope you enjoy this wonderful interview with Cindy Wigglesworth, the author of “The 21 Skills of Spiritual Intelligence“.  You can click here to watch a great PBS interview in which Cindy provides the viewer with insight into her personal philosophy and history.

 

Dan PallottaIn my interview with Dan Pallotta we discuss a his newly designed program called “Change Course“.  I have interviewed Dan previously about his book entitled “Uncharitable-How Restraints on Non-Profits Undermine Their Potential.”   Dan Pallotta has been involved in  lifting up the profile of non-profits for years.  At age 21 he organized a bike ride across America to raise awareness about world hunger,  he also launched a for profit enterprise that was responsible for developing AID’s rides as well as the 3-Day Brest Cancer walks.  Needless to say Dan Pallotta is not stranger to the world of non-profit.

Dan realized that many people are torn mentally and emotionally about where to spend their time.  So many of us want to help in the non-profit sector, yet we feel that we are not doing enough or don’t have the time.   We want to know how to make the transition and feel comfortable with our decisions. This boot camp for idealists, activists and social entrepreneurs and anyone exploring how to make a good living and a big difference will help anyone seeking to have fulfilling work while making a living.  In Change Course, Dan and his team are going to guide the attendees and inform them about: 1) the pros and cons of a non-profit career 2) making a difference in every moment 3) duty and responsibility vs. joy and opportunity 4) social enterprise vs. social entrepreneurship 5) maximizing the impact of personal philanthropy and much more.

If you are like most people you may want to get involved with charitable work, but  could or would you every make a career of it?   Dan will help guide attendees in determining what their options are, as well as help resolve the dilemmas that many face in making non-profit work a career.   If you want to learn more about the Change Course, please listen to this informative podcast.  You can also click here to be directed to the Change Course website which will provide you with the information you will need to make your decision about attending the course.

Jamie WhealI recently conducted this wonderful podcast with Jamie Wheal about an amazing project that he and Steven Kotler the co-author of Abundance are working on.  I was first introduced to Jamie by Steven Kotler. Subsequent to my interview with Steven we started a wonderful dialogue and it lead to him informing me about “The Flow Genome Project“.  I was so enthralled with what they were working on that I invited Jamie his partner to do this podcast to inform my listeners about their mission.

I am certain that many of you are aware of the term “Flow” made aware to the world by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi the author of the book “Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience“.  He developed the term “flow states” to describe the state of peak experience which some will seek to recreate at any cost because it’s so enjoyable.   Flow is defined as the state of being where time slows, self vanishes, action and awareness merge into one–often referred to as peak experience, runner’s high, being in the zone or dropping in the pocket.

Jamie and Steven are on a mission to study flow states in what they refer to as “The Flow Dojo“.  They want to hack the flow state, and determine what physically, mentally and emotionally is occurring to the body when someone has these peak experiences.  In other words they want to map the genome of Flow, which if they can do this would be an amazing feat.

The information and data received as a result of studying people who attain this states of consciousness would be extremely valuable because flow states are known to optimize performance, enhance creativity, drive innovation, accelerate learning, amplify memory and underpin happiness itself.   If they could recreate these “flow states” and know what is required to do so, imagine what could happen in our business world.  This data and process would become an extreme advantage to any employer that was involved helping their employees achieve and sustain the “state of flow.”

Jamie and Steven have created a website dedicated to this project, and you can access it by clicking here to learn more about “The Flow Genome Project“.  At the website you will find articles, videos and you can read more about the “Flow Dojo”.

In my estimation this project takes human performance and mastery to a whole new level.  If Steven and Jamie can quantify their research and hack the state of flow, this would be an amazing breakthrough.

 

If you are interested in getting involved, please sign up at their website and you will be contacted with more information.  I hope you enjoy this great interview with Jamie Wheal about the “Flow Genome Project”.

Nancy AndersonAuthor Nancy Anderson is probably the best career coach that I have every interviewed.  She not only seems to have a special intuition about what one’s career path should be, she has an amazing wise insight into our current career marketplace.  What I love about her book ” Work with Passion in Midlife and Beyond” is that it is easy to read and more importantly full of great advice and guidance.

What she conveys in our interview together is that when one reaches midlife the desire to have a vocation that is meaningful and on purpose is heightened.  As she states we have gone through our years of  raising kids, growing our bank accounts and now we want to focus on a vocation that will make a difference.

I would concur with her, for me personally this happened when I turned age 50.  I also have spoken with many of my friends and their seems to be a stirring and uncomfortable feeling that we don’t have much time and we need to change career course with more meaningful work.

Nancy states that change for the better takes place in three (3) stages.  The first stage is when you admit that what your’re doing is not working, and you ask for help if you need it.  Then comes the second and most difficult state, stopping what your’re doing that is not working.  If you persist in your efforts, you reach the third and final state, making choices that work for your.  Now this may all sound simple, but when you are in the middle of a career and considering a choice this can be scary.

Nancy says that identifying and facing our fears is the crucial step in the first stage of change.  She states that in the book “Think and Grow Rich” Napoleon Hill discribes six basic fears that keep you stuck in the past. These fears are as follows: 1) the fear of poverty 2) the fear of criticism, 3) the fear of loss of love 4) the fear of illness 5) the fear of old age 6) the fear of death.  I would say that about covers them all.

Nancy also recommends that when we are ready to take the next step that we rewrite our life story.  Now this is probably the best advice for anyone wanting to explore their authentic self and the core of their personality.  Going through this exercise is very revealing, and can be life altering–I know for I have completed this exercise and it is extremely empowering.  You see that once you do this exercise this much if revealed from your past, and frequently we are carrying emotional baggage forward into our life today and it is not serving us.

So, if you want to work with passion and live the life you want I think that Nancy Anderson book “Work with Passion in Midlife and Beyond” is the perfect reference.  She also is the author of “Work with Passion” which is also a great book on career coaching.  If you want to learn more about Nancy and how she can help you specifically please click here to be directed to her website.

 

I hope you enjoy my interview with this wonderfully insightful career and life coach–Nancy Anderson.  You can also watch a wonderful video at YouTube by clicking here.

Sallie FeltonIt is the beginning of a New Year for everyone, and if you are like me it is time to do some house cleaning.  I have known Sallie Felton author of “Why Can’t I Get Rid of this Clutter” for sometime, what I did not know that she is known at the clutter coach.

In my interview with Sallie  about her new book “Why Can’t I Get Rid of This Clutter” she provides sound practical advice for anyone looking to find the top of their desk, to cleaning out all of that stuff that has been hanging around collecting dust and zapping our psychic energy.  As Sallie states in her book clutter show up in our lives in three ways–mentally, physically and emotionally. Each area plays an important role in our well-being and none of them stand alone.

Mental clutter show us and is a recipe for an over-stressed, over scheduled, and over exhausted and over stimulated self. Throw all of these request, demands and obligation into the blender, puree at hight speed and whats’ the result? Dis-ease. Mental, physical and emotional stress have to go somewhere and if we don’t find outlets for them, we’ll direct them inward.

Physical clutter is the one we think of when we hear the word.  It is all that VISIBLE stuff that piles up around us and take over our work and living space.  Physical clutter affects different people in different ways.  Spend a few moments thinking about how you react to it.  What happens when you take a good look at all the stuff?  Do you feel a pit from in your stomach?  Does it grate on your nerves.  No matter how you feel inside, the physical stuff interferes with our productivity, clarity of mind and focus.

Emotional clutter comes straight from the heart.  It includes the feelings surrounding past and present issues we haven’t yet processed, worked through, nurtured or release. Emotional clutter is judgment, expectation, unresolved conflicts and self-defeating behaviors, like perfectionism.

If you are starting your New Year off with physical, emotional, or mental clutter then you owe it to yourself to listen to this podcast with Sallie Felton.  I highly recommend her book as well you can get lots of tips from her website by clicking here.

You can see Sallie Felton in action at YouTube by clicking here or  Enjoy this great interview with a woman who can really help us all get our acts together.