Podcast 968: Master Mentors Volume 2: 30 Transformative Insights from Our Greatest Minds with Scott Jeffrey Miller

Returning for this podcast is the author of upcoming book Master Mentors Volume 2: 30 Transformative Insights from Our Greatest Minds, Scott Jeffrey Miller. His new book is set to be released on October 11, 2022. We also had Scott promote the book’s first version here in Inside Personal Growth last year. If you want to check that, you may click here.

Scott defines himself as an unfiltered leader thriving in a highly filtered corporate culture and that he is journeying to own his story (and moving from Mess to Success) and inspiring others to uncover and own theirs. He built a 26-year career in the world’s most respected and influential leadership development firm serving in nearly every role imaginable. Aside from this, he is also a multi-bestselling author, radio and podcast host, leadership coach, columnist, and global keynote speaker.

Meanwhile, on this second volume of Master Mentors, whether you are challenged, affirmed, informed, or inspired, Scott guarantees you will experience a transformative shift in your personal mindset, life skillset, and career toolset.

If you’re interested to know more about Scott and his amazing works, you may click here to visit his website.

I hope you enjoy my engaging interview with Scott Jeffrey Miller. Happy listening!

THE BOOK

Depending on where you are in your journey, Master Mentors will:

  • Challenge your current mindset and beliefs, leading to what could be the most important career and thought process shifts of your life!
  • Restore you to the mindset and beliefs you find effective but aren’t currently living in alignment with.
  • Validate that you are on the right path with your current mindset and beliefs and empower you on your way forward.

THE AUTHOR

Scott built a 26-year career in the world’s most respected and influential leadership development firm serving in nearly every role imaginable. His professional roles evolved as he became a multi-bestselling author, radio and podcast host, leadership coach, columnist, and global keynote speaker. He continues to consult with FranklinCovey and is proud to continue their collaboration as he expands his own influence through new books, speeches, and coaching offerings.

 

You may also refer to the transcripts below for the full transciption (not edited) of the interview.

Greg Voisen
Hey, well welcome back to Inside Personal Growth. This is Greg Voisen and the host of Inside Personal Growth. And I have Scott Miller joining us from Salt Lake City, Utah. Yay, Scott. Hey Scott, you have two different shirts on, is it?

Scott Jeffrey Miller
A fall so it was a chilly this morning. So I had this short sleeve shirt on and I had the takedown on my car driving my son's to school. So I ended up putting, like a thermal shirt under it. So pardon my pardon this it was a fall kind of thing this morning.

Greg Voisen
Well, you know, the interesting thing is, is Scott was on the show, back in October of 2021. For the master mentor Number One Series. We're just now approaching one year and he said he was going to do this. This was master mentor number two, where he's chosen 30 more people that are part of this series that he's on. And I want to let my listeners know a little bit about you a Scott is a highly sought after speaker, author and podcast host. He is Wall Street Journal Best Selling Author and currently serves as Franklin Covey Senior Advisor on thought leadership prior to his advisory roles, Scott was a 25 year Franklin Covey associate serving as the Chief Marketing Officer and Executive Vice President. He hosts the on leadership with Scott Miller where you can get that you can just go to Scott miller.com. And that's where you can pick up more about him world's largest and fastest growing weekly leadership podcast. So Scott, I know you put a lot of effort in this, and I appreciate you as an individual and in person. And you've chosen 30 people, you and I were just going through the list, comparing notes of who the people were that we both have interviewed for our shows. And we just shared some intellectual property between people. And I appreciate that because, you know, your series focuses on leadership, but it focuses on a lot more spokes on marketing. It's focused on sales. But in the introduction of the book, you spoke about Bruce Williams, the most influential mentor in your life, somebody that you've never met or had a conversation with, but absolutely your master Minar. Can you share the story with the listeners and why you're so passionate about doing this series on master mentoring? I think you've got planned what five it is or how many 10 volumes, volumes. Okay, well, that means every year he's going to be doing volume, maybe sooner. So tell us about Bruce Williams, and why he's your master mentor.

Scott Jeffrey Miller
I'd be honored. Greg, thanks again for the spotlight and the platform. You know, I have a lot in common. We'd like to shine the spotlight on other people. I think you and I have maybe we're brothers from a different mother. Then I opened the book master mentors Volume Two where I shine the spotlight on 30 new mentors drawn for the podcast 10 Year 10 volume book deal with HarperCollins. I just finished volume three, by the way, we'll come out next October. Great people of volume three. Robin Sharma, Arianna Huffington, Mel Robbins, Deepak Chopra, Adam Grant, it's gonna be great. Volume three is going to be awesome. Yeah. But to your point, I'm kind of redefining what it means to be mentor to be a mentor. Most of us think of our mentors as being in the C suite on the fourth floor or 10th floor. It's somebody you go and meet with weekly for coffee. And that's also true. But I also think that if you really think about it, most of us have been mentored by people that don't know who we are. Perhaps we read their books, we listen to their podcasts, we go follow them at conferences to hear their speeches. And one such person for me was a man named Bruce Williams. He really founded this whole idea of talk radio back in the 80s. He had a radio program Monday through Friday for three hours. It was sort of like Dave Ramsey meets a Shark Tank, right where you called it and you ask questions, and he was a lawyer and entrepreneur, I think he was like at a town council, and kind of homespun wisdom, but really good experience based wisdom where he talked about why you needed a will, why you needed an attorney to close a real estate transaction, right? What was term insurance versus home insurance and he just gave you good advice on how to manage your finances, launch a business care for your family and he actually launched Sally Jessy Raphael, she actually was a psychiatrist or psychologist and he helped to launch her after his program. But anyway, after listening to Bruce Williams radio show during junior high school and high school for nearly eight years, three hours a night when most of my friends are probably listening to YouTube on there or not YouTube you to on the radio I was listening to this Colin talk show. My point is Bruce Williams died not even knowing Scott Miller was alive, never met him never interviewed him, never spoke to him. But without question, Bruce Williams was the most influential mentor in my life. This I opened the book master mentors talking about him to remind you all that the 30 people that are in master mentors are that 300 of my podcast or the hundreds from Greg's podcast, they can absolutely be your mentors, as you take insights, what to do, what not to do, what to say what not to say, I very much believe that we learn more from people's mistakes than we do their successes. I don't have Greg's wisdom, I don't have Greg's Good luck. I don't have Greg's finances, I can't replicate what Greg does. Well, for the most part, what I can do is I can learn from his mistakes and learn from his foibles and avoid them. Heck, half the success in life is just not doing stupid stuff, quite frankly. So that's why I opened the story, not as a master mentor, but as an intro to kind of re scope what it means to have mentors in your life, recognizing that you are probably the mentor to other people that you don't even know it.

Greg Voisen
I'm sure maybe there's some out there that you know, are faithful listeners, maybe I'm a mentor, too. But I think more importantly is I go back to we were talking about Cynthia holler cubby and the book, Life and crescendo, about contribution. You know, I think for me, this show is about how can I contribute to people? How can I help and serve in a way and you know, my nonprofit compassionate communications that serves the homeless? To me, this is a way to give back. And you know, you state that your hope in authoring the book is to present master mentors to the listeners to invite them to enter a similar type of relationship with any of the mentors presented in the book of which there's 30. Can you tell the story about how you selected these 30 mentors for this one, you just talked about volume three already. And you gave us you dropped some really big names in there like Deepak and all the rest of them. And now and how their transformational insights resonated with Scott Miller. Yeah, no more importantly, because you know, when you're an author, regardless of if it's picking interviews, or whatever it might be, you can only have to carefully go through Scott, and choose what you think's going to resonate with your audience and what you want to get out. And I'm really curious to get into your head as to how you select it. I have a very short little, teeny list here, but I see your list, how you selected these people

Scott Jeffrey Miller
and why. You know, Greg, both publishers will tell authors don't write for you right for your audience. And I think that's smart. By that, I always follow that wisdom. Because what I've done is I've written what resonated with me as a father, as a husband, as a brother as a, as a, as a parent, as an entrepreneur, as a leader. As a guy who has a stutter. As the guy who wishes he had a higher net worth and wish I had better friendships, right? I'm just a normal guy, make it through life everyday trying to pay the mortgage and raise three kids and keep my marriage together and be paid for their college. I'm lucky. So I what I did is I curated insights that I thought would help my life because I don't think I'm that different than most people, right? I say stupid things. And I do stupid things. I offer apologies. And I'm jealous. And I'm insecure. And I'm successful. I'm a hard worker, I'm just like everybody else in the world. I have a little more courage than most people that sometimes serves me well. And sometimes it doesn't. But what I did is I tried to curate 30 people that I think have a transformational insight shared on the podcast, or maybe even off. As you know, most of the good stuff is shared before and after the camera goes live, right? So with their permission, I curated 30 insights that I thought would help people and all their roles in life, but they're intentionally episodic. It might be about your personal finance or building your brand or parenting or entrepreneurship or creating better systems for your business or just thinking about your legacy or your family traditions. It's very episodic intentionally. And so I shared a spotlight on people from different backgrounds. I tried to mix it up with different people from different nationalities and if different races, different genders, different generations, different industries. Some of them are world famous celebrities, and some of them you've never heard of, but they survived a commercial Pakistani plane crash and live to tell about it. And there are amazing lessons from his story. So I try not to make it a jumbled mess, but a little bit of a, you know, read it at night for 12 minutes as you're going to bed, close the book and pick it up tomorrow, not having to remember what you read the day before. So that's kind of how I like to read books as short chapters. I asked some profound questions, I share some stories on myself. I think it's working pretty well, because volume one, slowly Well, in Volume Two is sold out. The book launches in about two weeks. And it's already sold out at preorder. And I'm delighted about that. So those printing presses better start running.

Greg Voisen
So question, I got the impression and I want to give this correctly to my listening audience. You have cards with this one with QR codes on it? I do. And those QR codes are designed to take the listener exactly where so the cards and the book are purchased together, right?

Scott Jeffrey Miller
Well, no, not exactly. So in the book at the end of each chapter, I have a QR code. QR code takes you exactly to that podcast episode, both video and audio like you my podcast was on video. So those QR codes are at the end of each chapter. But additionally, when I speak on the book, which is multiple times a week, headed to Croatia tomorrow to speak on it. I actually don't use PowerPoint, I only use card deck. So every keynote I give, there actually is a printed card deck that comes in a little box, I don't use slides, and on the back of each of the mentors, that the inside is shared. But there also is the QR code on the back of the card deck that also will take you to their episodes. So if you liked the episode with John Gordon, the energy bus right or Bobby Herrera or Marie Forleo, the car deck at my keynote speeches takes you right to their podcast. But those same QR codes are in the printed book as

Greg Voisen
you can our listeners get those cards or those cards are only available at your speech.

Scott Jeffrey Miller
Listen, if your listeners want to send me a message on LinkedIn, and connect to me, and give me their shipping address, I will send them a complimentary set of cards. I love to buy the book, you don't have to buy the book to get the card decks, it'd be a nice thing. But if you want to find me on LinkedIn, you can't miss me. Send me a message. Tell me you saw me on Greg's awesome podcast and give me your shipping address. I won't come to your house, I promise I'll ship you your free deck of cards.

Greg Voisen
Well, I got that there's a QR code in the book. So if they get the book, they're gonna get the same thing really, in essence. But sometimes, you know, you never know they want to share a card with somebody and say here, go, you know, I'm thinking for you. Because this book is doing so well. The cards ought to be out there with the people and they ought to be sharing it said just bought this great master mentor, Volume Two series. Here's a card and go listen to this podcast, buy the book.

Scott Jeffrey Miller
It's true. I want to be thoughtful not to put that mentors in a position that I'm not selling their image turn monies I generally don't sell the car deck God, we provide it with our keynotes. But out of respect to the mentors,

Greg Voisen
you're doing an amazing job of organizing the content in the data in the book. And the first part of the book you featured a very sad story about Zafar is that Assad particularly sorry, shoot yes to May 20, 2020. Can you tell the listeners let the listeners more a little bit about that story and insights because that's a very interesting story.

Scott Jeffrey Miller
He's the opening mentor in Volume Two master mentor number 31 His name is a Pharmaceut he is the CEO of the Bank of Punjab a large bank in Pakistan. And as the CEO of this bank, he flies between the offices quite frequently Lahore to Karachi always seats sits and seat one B this class aisle seat this particular flight was just after the pandemic had exploded and airlines were back in the air fairly. He gets to the airport early one day and notices that the airline has been seat one he always sits the seat one bit when b manages to get his seat changed. Moved to one B plane takes off our so flight the plane lands in Lahore, but as soon as the plane lands it takes back off again kind of a really rough landing plane takes back off again comes back around for a second landing and what no one knew was that the pilots had failed to lower the landing gear. This is a this is you know reputable airline in Pakistan. Anyone here could fly it if you were over in Asia. The pilots have forgot to lower the landing gear so when they landed they damaged the engines irreparably. plane comes back around, crashes and explodes in a residential area hits all these buildings and Zafar Massoud survives. 98 passengers and crew perish. Two people live two passengers So far in one other person. Wow. So far the plane breaks apart so far seat leaves the plane with him still buckled in, falls from the sky. Now listen everybody to this. It's incomprehensible. He falls from the sky up right? Alive, unconscious on fire strapped into his airline seat, it hits the top of the building slides down. And he lands on the hood of a car upright, strapped in alive, unconscious on fire. There are two young men sitting in the car, getting ready to turn it on to go to work that morning. And all of a sudden, all the windows blow out of their car, including the windshield, and they come to you and there's a man sitting on their hood, alive, upright, and the airline seat on fire unconscious. They rescue him. And he lives with enormous survivor's grief. survivor's guilt, to tell this story. And the insight in the book is what do you do when you survived? commercial airline crash? What's next? If I write a whole series of questions around, what would you do what's next for you and I shared some Tinder stories around as a dad, I gotta create some more traditions for our three sons, their eight, their 10 of their 12. And I got to live every day as if I just survived the airline crash. And I'm gonna go take the roll by storm. So that's just one of 30 like jaw dropping stories, people that survived massive traumas or people that you know, just did something really cool by working their butts off and what you can learn from it?

Greg Voisen
Well, I know for a fact that the experience, you know that when they sit when they say write a book, you know, you had me on the edge of the seat there with the story not only the way you told it, but I'm sure the way he experienced it as well. But the point is, it's about the experience. And they always say to right, if you're in a theater whispering in someone's ear something special, right? I always love that. And Scott, you might not have been whispering right now. But the message that came through as a mentor was what more can you contribute as a result of this tragic event? The tragedy that you had in your life. Can you like you said, you started writing questions for your sons? What more can I do now? To make this better, right to make this world a better place? And you have so many people in there you have BJ Fogg, you know, Guy Kawasaki, and you've got all these great mentors in there, and many have been on my show. You've read a MoGraph, seeing around corners, you know, all this. There's a chapter in there from Sean Covey. And you state that he shared his opinion about the differences between self-worth self-esteem and self-confidence. And I think this is really important out of the nine children. Cynthia is the oldest, right? But out of the nine children. What I realized from Cynthia that most of the world probably doesn't know is that Stephen Covey, tried to treat all of his children equally tried, but wasn't always a success, but tried. In other words, think about that, as a father with how busy he was trying to spend time with all of these nine children and spread his time and do an inner she tells a great story in there. They all sound quite similar. And I'm talking about Shawn cubby right now. And I think most of us lump them into a similar category. I know I certainly did. What advice can you give the listeners about self-worth self-esteem and self-confidence as it relates to the Sean Connery story? Because all of us as a father, as a husband, you're now trying to live your life so that you can give your children equal time, right? And you're trying to bring them up with self-worth, self-confidence, self-esteem, whatever it might be. Tell the story in the book, and how that impacted you and how as a mentor, you saw it as something you needed to tell.

Scott Jeffrey Miller
Thanks, Greg, with your point. Sean Covey is one of the nine children of the iconic author, Dr. Stephen R. Covey, who wrote the seminal book The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People and was the genesis now at the Franklin Covey company, the world's largest and most trusted leadership firm in the world. He also is the author of many books, including The Seven Habits of Highly Effective teams, which is the most successful team leadership book in history. Sean is the president of our of our education division and he runs an Ironman as active team for a decade together, I think of all the things that Sean Covey has taught me which are immense. One day in passing a decade ago, Sean, he's been on the podcast, Sean said to me, he wrote a book called the six most important decisions you'll ever make. And it's a book written aimed at teenagers. I think it's a masterpiece. And I read it as a single guy like 10 years ago, wasn't even married yet had no kids wasn't married, playing tennis, traveling the world. I read the book one day in a plane and said, Shawn, from this book is amazing. The six most important decisions you'll ever make too great book if you're a parent. And then in this conversation, Shawn taught me the difference between self-worth, self-esteem and self-confidence. And I think that big insight is we tend to use those terms, I think a bit interchangeably, unconsciously, right. self-worth, self-esteem, self-confidence. No, they're actually quite different. Sean taught me the concept that your self-worth is creator given. If you're religious, it's God given if you're not, it's some something created you but Sean believes that your self-worth is inherent, all of us have the same amount of self-worth. You can't lessen it or increase it your self-worth is complete. And all of us have the same self-worth its creator, given. I thought I'm a religious person. But I thought even if I wasn't, that seems logical to me, no one can impact adversely or positive my self-worth because my self-worth is the same as Sean Covey says, and I write a tinder story about how sometimes I was quite jealous of Sean Covey, and the executive team meetings because he was always Well, how was your father? How is your mother, no one ever asked how my mother or my father was. And I always felt a little inferior to the celebrities and the cubby family. And it had nothing to do with them, it had to do with me, my self-worth was the same as Sean Covey's Roger Federer or Brene, brown, or you name it myself with the same. Now my self-confidence and my self-esteem vary wildly based on lots of things, right? How I view myself, what are my priorities? What are my values? And so I really wanted people to understand your self-worth is inherent. And don't let anybody try to lessen it, because they can't. And either, can you focus on your self-esteem, and your self-confidence, read the book to learn how we define those and some of the things that can lessen them or strengthen them, recognizing that, you know, if you assess and judge yourself on measures that truly matter, no one, nothing can decrease, or maybe even increase your self-esteem, your self-confidence because you're in control of it. Second Chapter,

Greg Voisen
I think that's the most important thing is that you are in control of it. Now, the other insight from a psychological standpoint is that's what we have to work on. That's why we call this personal growth mastery. That's why we talk at human potential movement. It's because it's our job to take responsibility for our own potential. It's nobody else's job. You and I, every day when we get on a podcast, and these words flow through these speakers that people are listening to. It could be one sentence, it could be a paragraph, it could be something. But that has to stick with somebody. And then somebody has to take it and do some action with it. Something other than just Oh, that was a great podcast that Greg voice and did with Scott Mellon. No, it isn't about the 1000s of words. It's maybe about the 15 or 16 words that you take from this, like what Scott just said, I think the delineation between self-worth, self-confidence, self-esteem, those are really important. It's really important. Now,

Scott Jeffrey Miller
Greg, Greg, quick introduction, when I wanted to feature Sean Covey. I mentioned this and Sean said, Yeah, I don't know much about that. I don't know you should feature me on that topic. And I said, no, actually, Shawn, it was profound. Now I'm not I'm not an intellectual, right? I don't, I don't have a background in philosophy or the human condition. I'm just a guy trying to get along. But I found it profound. Just understanding there is a difference in IQ, and you can or cannot raise them based on which one they are. And quite frankly, if you're in control, nothing anybody else does can impact any of the three of those so you have complete control over it.

Greg Voisen
Well, it's a great point you made and again, if that one point gets through today to the listening audience, it's going to be it's going to be great. No, we boast at both had Chester Elton on. Yes, Chester? This Tapti about things it in the workplace with just no luck. We all went through this COVID Together, we are plenty of anxiety in the workplace. Now we're seeing inflation the way it is. And people are looking at, you know, maybe jobs being rolled off and whatever and they anxiety am I going to be able to do it is you state that you learned the most about branding from Chester? Can you tell our listeners about Chester Elton, and the teachings that he shared with you about branding? And while you're at it, you know, look, this anxiety in the workplace is a real thing. We've all been talking about this for a long time. So I love Chester. I love what he's doing. He and his partner. Great. Yep. Great book. Tell us why you picked Chester. Yeah, one of your 30.

Scott Jeffrey Miller
I'm gonna address both of your points. So Chester Elton, of course, is a very famous author, coach, podcast or speaker. He's really known about employee appreciation. He's written extensively about how to build cultures where people feel appreciated and valued and choose to stay. He's written extensively about gratitude. And his last book was called anxiety in the workplace. And it really had a profound impact on me, I do not suffer from depression or anxiety. I do not have suicidal tendencies or ideation. I don't know if it's my genetics or my personality or my environment. But I'm very blessed not to be afflicted by that, but one of my employees is. And a man who works for me in his 20s has crippling clinical depression, and anxiety, and has some PTSD and is an absolute genius MacGyver, and you work super hard. And there are times when he can't come to work for four days, because he's considering taking his life. I mean, it's that's how severe it is. And he's under the under the therapy of a physician, and he has medications that change periodically, and he mentioned his distress really well. And as a hard charging entrepreneur, it's hard for me not to have to employ a guy, that I'm paying him out of my kid's college budget, right, and our business not to come to work for four days. And so I've had to really change my mentality to understand how to create a culture, I don't cause him more stress, because his value to me is incalculable when he is working, which is the vast majority of time. So I actually turn the chapter over to my associate this 25 year old kid, and I he writes an open letter to all of those people who do have anxiety. And then he writes a similar open letter to all the Scott Miller leaders who don't on how to work with him. It's a lovely chapter, I basically turn it over to my 25 year old employee named Drew Young. Now, to answer your other question around Cestrum brand, you know, for those of you who know, Chester, you know, he wrote a very famous book called the carrot principle with his business partner, Adrian god sick. And he became sort of known as the apostle of appreciation. He's very animated. He wears orange. Everywhere he goes, he gives out little stuffed carrot plush carrots in the audience, and he says hysterical, he's insanely competent, and he's a wildly fun engaging entertainer. And so you might think that his brand is the guy that wears orange glasses and socks Norge tie, that's it. That's also true. But Chester's real blunt brand is he's loyal. He holds competences. He's punctual. He makes and keeps commitments. He doesn't gossip. I text Chester, I need your wisdom for 10 minutes. My planes landing in Dublin and 30 I'll call you then. Chester. I need 15 minutes to walk through an issue I've got. I'm coming off the stage in 30 minutes. I'll call you on my way to the airport. I mean, he's just always there for me. I think his brand is a guy who shows up for his friends and he makes and keeps commitments and doesn't gossip and keeps confidences and so the brand that I want to reinforce his independent of his you know, onstage razzle dazzle, you know, a posture of appreciation. It's hysterical. He's an amazing keynoter. That's his show. At the end of the day off air, he is smart and wise and contemplative and deliberate. And I've said it for the third time, Chester simply makes and keeps commitments and when he can't, he calls you up and said, my bad. I made a mistake. I can't do that deal because I just reviewed my contract that precludes me I'm sorry. How can I make it up to you that actually happened with Chester and I ask yourself with your brand beyond whether you wear cufflinks or how you dress or what kind of briefcase you carry. What's your real brand? Do you make and keep commitments? Do you tell the truth When you inflate something, do you say actually that's not true? If you ever in meeting say, you know what? Whose idea was that? Oh, yeah, mom, that was ridiculous. Who's got a better idea than that right is are you there to be the genius or to quote Liz Wiseman? Are you there to be the genius maker of others and I hope in this chapter, which is mainly focused on anxiety and how to lead employees who have anxiety, crippling or just, you know, less so that you also think about what your brand is, as well and have you behaved your wreck? Have you behave yourself into the brand you deserve and want?

Greg Voisen
And I think you speak with Chester about character, because his brand is character, both as a character, and his character stands for itself, just what you said, because of his integrity, his humility, his ability to come back to you and say, look, I messed up, how can I make it up to you? His honesty, his trust, all the words you want to use to describe our character? And that brand becomes a character, you know that. It's like Scott Miller. He's a character. And he's got a great brand. Yep. Now shifting gears a bit. I became pretty good friends with David seventh. And as a result of me doing, I'm going to say idea salon solve next. I'm very much into visual learning. You've had David on the show. And He's authored several books about visual learning and as a firm in San Francisco. Yep. And he is, in my estimation, and I'm not going to put anybody on a pedestal. He's the grandfather of Yes.

Scott Jeffrey Miller
Really? Yes. Yes, absolutely. Probably

Greg Voisen
in his late 70s. Now, and but, again, you just talked about Chester in character. I have never met a man. So more impeccable than David civet. About how he works with people in Visual Learning. Talk with us. Why did you choose David civet? And why was visual learning of a guy like yourself? Who's like literally like, oh, you know, really interesting to you.

Scott Jeffrey Miller
I so hope people buy the book. Because the chapter on David Sibbett is worth the book alone. David Sibbett. To your agreement is the Godfather, Grandfather of visual communication with a litany of books called Visual leadership, visual meetings, visual communication. He's a master artist is but what he's done brilliantly is he's communicated what he calls seven frames and seven figures, that anybody like me who is not a visual artist can use to build your credibility inside of your organization. For example, when you are in a team meeting at the CTOs house, and you're unfortunately, given the magic marker, and your job is to go up to the chart pattern capture the notes for two days or two hours, you don't know whether to put the information into a four box model or into a Venn diagram or how to how to draw stick people are, you know, all that kind of stuff. And I'm actually I think competent, verbal communicator, I was stutter, I'm a lifelong stutter. I've mentioned that frequently. And it has sometimes hijacked my vision by verbal communication. But what I've often been jealous of is that same person that they get that marker, unfortunately, to be the Proctor and then they just beautifully capture all the information. They know what to capture what not to capture, how to organize it, how to emphasize it. I think it's an art. Now perhaps it's an art more so when we were less hybrid and less virtual, but a lot of us are very much back in the offices to some extent. And we're in meetings and we're looking to influence people. David teaches the seven figures and seven friends how to draw a circle, how to draw a stick figure how to draw a throw line, how to draw a star, when to put information into what he calls a Mandela are a four box model how to emphasize stuff. And these skills I think are vital for anyone who's trying to improve their credibility as someone who can actually illustrate your ideas. At the end of the day, unless you have a sight impairment. I think all of us have some level of visual learning, right? Whether it's tactile or auditory, whatever it is, look at me behind me look at you behind you, right. And so when I was at the Disney company 30 years ago, one of the arts that an intern had from graduate school was the ability to take kind of data in written words and bring it to life and a business plan that people like me could actually see and digest really easily. And David has exploded this in his books and his company, the growth consultants. I don't do a very good job at implement During his art, because I'm a fairly frenetic person, and I want to capture everything or nothing, I get overwhelmed easily. But these, these seven figures, and seven free, which are fraction, fraction of David's, you know, content He graciously allowed me to share in the book. And if you're looking to increase your credibility, whether it's at a whiteboard, a chart pad at a conference, at a team meeting, you're gonna look really smart and a team meeting, read David's book, pick up the chapter of mine, and it will transform your sense of confidence and your credibility. And maybe you're maybe you're creating a deck, right, maybe you're creating a deck and you're drawing or sketching it out, or whatever it is. His skills are valuable, like you said, he's a little quirky is that a great personality, lost his wife several years ago, and then found a new love and married her. And I just am a big fan of David Sibbett.

Greg Voisen
Well, there's a term that's used for people that are very, very proficient at this skill. And it's a graphic facilitator. And David is the creme de la creme when it comes to graphic facilitators. I have friends that are graphic facilitators, and they studied under David, myself, I understand the basics of this, I wouldn't consider myself an artist, but I can get up at a whiteboard and do what you just talked about. And I think it's really important. Now your book, you know, with these 30 people, Scott, what I want to do is direct our listeners to Scott, Jeffrey miller.com. Go there. You can order this book, Master manners. Number three, I'm sorry, number two, I'm sorry, I'm ahead of myself, because he already talked about three, there is gonna be a three coming out. And, you know, everybody from Michael Hyatt to David Sibbett. We don't have time to cover all of these people. That's why you need to go get the book. The other thing is, is that, you know, Scott, in each chapter, there's transformational insights. If you were to leave our listeners with one or two transformational insights, which ones would you say would be greatest ones? And what would be how they can integrate that advice into their life today. If there's something that just stood out for you, yeah. yester Minar to you and you said, Okay, there's, you know, there's BJ Fogg and he's got habits and you got to do this. Tell us what it is.

Scott Jeffrey Miller
Well, they're all equal in there. I think profoundness it just depends on where it hits the reader where they are in their life. Right. Yeah, that's how I got the book to be very short chapters. I think. The one that I probably share the most is Bobby Herrera. He's the second mentor. He's number 32. So one 230 Were the mentors and chapter one and 31 through 60 or chapter two,

Greg Voisen
you made a book. You mean in book one,

Scott Jeffrey Miller
book one. Thank you volume one. Thank you. Thank you. So Bobby Herrera is a very famous entrepreneur. He wrote a book called The Gift of struggle. It's a very short hardcover book called The Gift of struggle. And he shares a remarkable story that you cannot read without becoming emotional. It's the second chapter in the book, Volume Two, where I don't have time to share the whole story, but basically, he and his brother were on a high school football team as immigrant Mexicans living in Texas with very little funds. And every Friday night the bait the football team stopped after their game and they all went in and had dinner at a restaurant. Except for Bobby Herrera and his brother who stayed on the bus and ate the brown bag dinner. Their mom had packed for them because there was no money for the Herrera brothers to go into the dinner. And it wasn't the Ruth's Chris it was more like the Sizzler. But everybody knew that Herrera brothers stayed on the bus How humiliating every football game to stay in the bus eat your sandwich your mod pack UI. Your 40 friends are all in having soft serve ice cream and sirloin tips at the Sizzler will one night. One of the teammates came members father, a successful businessman rewards the bus, walks back to the Herrera brothers and says join us for dinner that's on me. No one's going to know. Do me a favor and exchange Pay It Forward sometime later in life. And Bobby says it was the first time in his life he ever felt seen by someone upgrade. I'm getting emotional telling the story crack because that man reboarded That bus and had no idea that profound impact it would have inviting Bobby and his brother just into dinner. I don't know if it was a Sizzler. But the point was it wasn't you know, $100 dinner, right? And Bobby said that no one in his life it ever made him feel seen before. Well, I go on until amazing story how 30 years later, Bobby writes this book called The Gift of struggle. He's a wildly successful entrepreneur. He finds the father 30 years later, a man named Harold Teague, still alive, hadn't talked to him, invites Harold to come to the book launch, where he shares this whole story for the first time ever in public. And everybody is dying in the audience crying, including Harold Tiki had no idea why he was even there later says to Bobby, I remember that day I had no idea the impact on you. It's an amazing story. But the idea of your point take away is Who will you reboard the bus for? Who will you made? Who will you make feel seen today? Will be someone in your team? Will it be your mother ally, your neighbor heard me. All of us have power, positional power, financial power and electrical power, principle centered power, coercive power, utility power, all of us have power. All of us have power to make someone feel seen. So the question is, is who will you park the bus for?

Greg Voisen
I think that's a great way to leave this and you're letting my listeners know and Scott, I just love the energy that you put behind the story. And that that story really helps people to see what is possible, which is taking that extra little step to help somebody. You know, I my authors who make contributions to my nonprofit, I tell them I'm very grassroots. I go out and I hand out $100 gift cards to guys on the streets. And that's what I do. And you know, I have stories that I've compiled from them just by taking my iPhone and recording it and how did you get out on the street. And it's one little helping hand because you never know what's going to happen with somebody like that, that if one person steps up just like this guy did on the back of the bus. It's that guys come on and have dinner. I just gave a card to a guy the other day at a at a bus stop. He knew he knew what he wanted to do is take the train to Oregon. I said great. Take this gift card, buy yourself a ticket, go to Oregon. That's where you get your that's what you got to do to get out of town. But my point is, is that your show my show this book, both books provide great stories for the listeners to actually look at and question things in their lives about what they can change, while sad, but they can make better. And I appreciate you every time I'm on I learn more and more. Every time we're on we share great people that we can collaborate with. So thank you so much. I know you've got to be line out of here and get on another call. But you are a blessing known estate to you man. I'll say to you, sir. Thanks so much for being on inside personal growth.

Scott Jeffrey Miller
My honor, Greg, thanks for the spotlight.

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