Podcast 875: The Tip of the Spear-Leading Business Transformation with Sam Palazzolo

If you would like to know more about the language of business transformation, you will definitely enjoy listening to my interview with Sam Palazzolo, the Founder and Managing Director of Tip of the Spear Ventures.

To know more about Sam and the Tip of the Spear Ventures, please click here to be directed to their website.

You may also click here to register for the 2021 Merger and Acquisitions Forecast that they offer and to get your free 128 question business transformation self-assessment.

Happy Listening!

Greg Voisen:
Welcome back to Inside Personal Growth. This is Greg Voisen, the host of Inside Personal Growth. And joining me from North Hollywood, is that right?

Sam Palazzolo:
West Hollywood.

Greg Voisen:
West Hollywood. I said North Hollywood, West Hollywood, California, for all of these, you're looking at this podcast either on our YouTube channel or you're hearing it, you obviously know where West Hollywood is, it's in California, is Sam Pallozano. And Sam has a company called Tip of The Spear Ventures. He reached out to us, and I was very impressed with what he's doing. One of the things to let my listeners know you can go up there and download your free 128 question business transformation self-assessment which we will direct them to in the blog as well. But I'm going to let the listeners know a little bit about you, Sam.

Greg Voisen:
He's an entrepreneur, a venture capitalist and author, a leader, professor non-profit philanthropist, and he brings a variety of value creation topics to entrepreneurs and business leaders. His ideas are actionable there's takeaways captured in the five books that he has written. And most recently the influential leader leading at the Tip of the Spear. He has a new book coming out at the beginning of next year, and we're going to kind of be dancing around with questions based on all of his books. But Sam has ideas basically from the influential leader. He's worked with the biggest of the biggest. He led a technology, SAS startup raising 8 million which was cutting edge technology. Sam's built a reputation as a successful investor having provided startup capital for several early stage ventures, as well as M and a activity.

He's also been invited to speak at some of the largest places around, including Amazon Starbucks, general mills, Microsoft Department of Defense, Harvard Business School, Dartmouth University Vanderbilt, and so on. He's graduated at Indiana University with a Bachelor's Degree in Business and Economics and Public Policy and received his MBA from Vanderbilt. And he's an accomplished additional graduate studies from the university of Texas, University of Michigan sales negotiation, Northwestern university on digital strategy and the University of London on business funding. Well, that's a big one. So how'd you find time to do all that Sam?

Sam Palazzolo:
Well, I think it's one of those things where somebody told me heading under the pandemic and thanks for having me, Greg, wouldn't it be a waste of time if we didn't do anything right. So, no, it's, it's through a series of really great friends, great recommendations from those friends and, and just I want to say a curiosity of, well, what is that and what does that look like and how can I potentially do something like that? That's, what's brought me on this journey throughout my business and professional career.

Greg Voisen:
Well, it's always about being curious. It starts with focus, goes to curious and then finding some passions and then coming up with your purpose. And you're definitely a purpose driven guy. And, you know, in the introduction we were reading your material and it was mentioned that your purpose in life is to have a positive difference on people around you. And to you use the platform? You have to make a positive difference in the world, obviously your philanthropic work as well. Can you tell our listeners a little bit more about yourself and the platform that you currently have to accomplish your purpose? Because if they go to tipofthespearventures.com you're going to see is advisory services is business equity, his blog and everything else he's got. And he's obviously on our platform because he wants to let our listeners know.

Sam Palazzolo:
Yeah, no, Greg, I, I think, you know, Tip of the Spear of Ventures is the firm that I founded in 2012 after I led the tech startup. We at the tech startup, it was a pretty much a 24-month type of a rocket ship ride. We had a successful private equity exit at the conclusion. And I said, that's, that's what I want to do. I want to, I'm going to launch a private equity firm. I know I have a financial background, full disclosure, so it wasn't quite the moonshot. It sounds like, but it Tip of the Spear. We very much have two sides of the house. We have a venture side of the house. We also have a consulting side of the house. I come from big consulting like Deloitte Dan's change management group or consulting services. As you mentioned, they surround the topic of business transformation.

Greg Voisen:
How is it that we can help accelerate businesses forward? We have a heavy sales biz dev focus therein, and the venture side of the house. We do a number of different things. We do early-stage seed funding for entrepreneurs that have a proven track record of a million-dollar annual revenue or more. We'll do some business funding consulting work on the venture side of the house, which consists of some customer funding options for those entrepreneurs. And then we also were really good M and a firm we're kind of late comers to the party, but we recognized like everybody, I think recognizes that we've got this really great demographic in America, the baby boomers who are going to be exiting the economy. And we want to make certain that if they don't have a clear line of succession outlined or identified, we want to be that clear line and we want to take their organizations forward and continue on with the legacy that those baby boomers, so rightly deserved over their years of ownership.

You mentioned some, the philanthropic work back in 2017 as a result of my I'm an adjunct faculty member. I've taught at the collegiate level since 2008. I teach over at UNL V the university of Nevada Las Vegas, which is an exec ed course based off of the book I wrote in 2018 called leading at the tip of the spear of the leader. And that was really an impetus for me to form a five one C3 nonprofit. We call it the javelin Institute. You'll notice that there's a lot of either spear throwing, javelin, chucking. You can call it whatever you want to, but we try to put it into this category of, you know, we're trying to do something that is really to the benefit of an executive offering to leaders. We really want a portion of our proceeds to benefit a certain population. And the population that we identified are leaders who experienced family hardship, family hardship for me, boils down to a couple of different things like four DS death, disease, divorce, and or drugs. But we find that leaders who experienced those hardships experience, a deceleration in their performance and production, and they're just looking for a better way or how to get out of the funk. And we've been able to help those types of entrepreneurs and leaders get back on track. So that's a brief,

Greg Voisen:
It's good that you're giving back. And, you know, you talked about family offices and working with family offices, and I obviously have worked with some as well, and I understand the challenges that and that's a particular part of brown succession. You know, you have millions and millions of dollars being transferred from one generation to the next. You have family disputes situations where father and son, maybe aren't getting along, or father and daughter aren't getting along or whatever it might be. When you, when you address that situation, because there's a lot of psychology involved in that. I go to the family firm Institute meetings. And you know, when you go to those meetings, you see psychologists there, you see CPAs there, you see attorneys there. And obviously there's a, a non-disclosure policy about when you go to those meetings, what goes on? What, what do you think really sets you apart? Because when these family from offices and there'll be some people on this podcast, that'll be listening to this a couple in particular that I know that are avid fans of the show, what makes a tip of the spear, do what they do more effectively? And what do you do that? Let's say your competitors may or may not do because they certainly, they certainly don't need you for venture funding.

Sam Palazzolo:
No, they sure don’t, I think it's one of those things. And I think that, you know, at the heart of it is a strategic partnership relationship. You know, we always said that in a Kim's from the senior consultant, my senior partner that I worked with for years, who always had the mentality of, we want to be known as strategic partners, vendor is a bad word. We don't want to be known as that, but we want to be known as the group or top of mind, whereby you know, leaders who go into a Monday morning meeting come out of it, typically with a, oh no moment, which is I have more things on the to-do list than I'm ever going to get to. If only I knew somebody that I could offload some of this to-do list to, we want to be top of mind. So that way we're first call right out of that type of meeting.

And, and that strategic partner relationship is one that we take very seriously also say this much, that, you know, I kind of operate and it's instilled, it's part of our culture here at Tip of the Sphere, as well as over at the javelin Institute that we're just not going to talk theory. We're going to actually get into the trenches and we're going to roll up our sleeves. And most importantly, everything that we do has three categories or three levels to it. We have a strategic overview, we have a tactical, this is the architecture of the blueprint or the playbook that we're going to operate in. And then we've got an actionable, this is exactly what it is we're going to do step-by-step and let's go to work and let's do it and check in accountability wise on it. So those three layers are a different,

Greg Voisen:
Help them with the eminent, just paraphrase this because Jim Huling was just on you know, the four disciplines of execution. You come out of a meeting and you're like, hey, wait. You know, I've got to focus on my wildly important goals. And then I have to execute on them and I have to keep a scoreboard. And after somebody have helped me do that. So, I can appreciate that that level of a coaching slash consulting slash advising is super important. Because when you look in most of these businesses, they'll create way more initiatives than they can actually complete, can complete. And many of them are kind of nonsensical. And so, you have to get down to what's the most important. And, you know, you mentioned there's typically two types of business transformation moments for leaders that they now face. And I think more than ever you know, I'm, I'm doing interviews now and it seems to be, there's a lot of books that have come out. I'm looking at a few on the side of my desk. One is called Rogue Waves, and then another one is by two Deloitte partners called Provoke. And the reality is, is that we're seeing so many of this futurist predicting the Rogue Waves. How are you seeing around corners? What are the two types that you talk and why are those so important to business and how do you help your clients see around corners to actually predict what might be coming or the rogue wave that could really upset their business?

Sam Palazzolo:
Yeah. I think we had a conversation yesterday with one of the leaders that we work with. Totally overwhelmed, totally underwater was concerned about, you know, everything, including their career. They felt like was in extreme jeopardy. And I hate to sound cliche, but it comes down to the business basics. Everybody's looking for the magic pill. Everybody wants to know how can we run the best practice. But in order to do that, you've got to do the block and the tackle, right. And the basics of business and the basics of operations. And, and so what it comes down to is identifying not only what it is that has to be done, but the prioritization in which those steps need to occur. And then it's a matter of going and executing across those steps. We see it time. And again, with the leaders that we work with, you know, I am an accountant by training. So, you hit on the concept of dashboards just to make certain that you're on time and on target approaching destination. That's a key element. But the thing that we also see, and this is not an advanced play, but maybe it isn't advanced play. And that is, there seems to be a breakdown in the communication chain from top of the organization to bottom of the organization, the message that originates from the top very rarely gets communicated clearly and concisely to the members at the bottom of the org chart. So those are a couple of areas

Greg Voisen:
What would you say Sam about = keeping that passion because it's, you know, look it's, if you don't manage your energy as an entrepreneur or somebody, and you've got all these players in your organization, it doesn't matter what size it is, but let's just say in upper management, 10, 15, 20 people in a small company and their companies, you know, many, many more. But the point is, is that as we've gone through this pandemic, and I'm not going to blame it on the pandemic, but as we've gone through these economic challenges that people have faced, they're also being faced with, how do I continue to inspire, not motivate, inspire keep the passion and align all the players toward a single vision that we want to accomplish. Because if that vision isn't compelling for everybody on the team to want to work after it becomes very watered down and, and you get you get real challenges, what do you guys do to help do that?

Sam Palazzolo:
Yeah, I, I think that within each leader's mind, there needs to be determination of with their team members. Is there an unwillingness or is there an unable moment, the unable moment that falls back on us as leaders, right? Greg, if somebody is not able to perform or conduct a task, either we didn't with clarity, provide them with direction and what it is that we want them to do and clarify expectations. Maybe they don't have the training to do it appropriately, or maybe they just don't have the resources, the technology, the equipment, those types of things, any of those unable moments. Again, those fall back squarely on the shoulders of the leader. I say there needs to be a determination between the unable, the inability or the unwillingness, because if you identify somebody as being unwilling, it's one of those situations where you, this is on the leader's shoulders to reassign or remove that type of an associate,

Greg Voisen:
But they have such a hard time extracting them. I use the term consciously incompetent. You know, I see a lot of conscious incompetence and because of their, how do I want to say it? I don't even use the word faithfulness, but you know, when you've had somebody who's been with you 10 years and they, that their position has been outgrown, right. And they really can't manage that position because the growth of the business has been more exponential than their ability to manage. What advice do you have for those kind of people listening in today?

Sam Palazzolo:
Okay. Yeah. We see, we see different leadership skills or muscles need to be flexed at different revenue, achievement levels. And there's certain plateaus, right? There's a million-dollar plateau. We see leaders needing to have different muscles flexing. Then at 10 million, it's a different set of muscles, a lot of what needed to be flexed at the million, but at a whole host of additional ones. So on and so forth, we see these different revenue plateaus. I'll put it to you this way. One of, one of my favorite leaders, I had a conversation with him. I asked one of my favorite questions, which is what are, what's one thing about your leadership style that you would change? And his response to me was, you know, I probably believe too much, I believe in the good of my associates and that they're going to go out each and every day and they're going to do good work.

It's that belief system that holds me back because I know this unwilling, unable moment. We have that conversation as well. He said, I know I need to get rid of folks. He said, but if I'm wrong for holding onto a person for too long, I'll take that. I can sleep better at night. I know that before I remove them or allow them the opportunity to be successful somewhere else that I tried everything that I could to prop that person up and to make them a better employee. I also know this much, and this is kind of my philosophy as well. I adopted it from him that every person that comes to work here, whether they stay for a couple of weeks, or if they stay for a couple of decades, each person is going to leave a better individual because they've had exposure and experiences with me. And yeah, it's, it's a great mentality to have.

Greg Voisen:
So you know what? We see more and more especially in the age in which we've entered into with high-tech arena is the entrepreneur. If you would, and this isn't about hiring practices, per se, we know that the talent search that's going on out there is massive right now. And that there's a lack of talent in every area. I mean, it goes all the way down to companies. I'm advising that are doing landscape maintenance, right? With hundreds of employees, all the way up to companies like Adobe and Google and wherever who, my son, who's an executive at Adobe constantly putting out messages. Do you know anybody who kind of thing? Cause we're looking right, right. And so, where do you believe? Or what advice might you give somebody who's, you know, looking at their org chart saying, man, I got 10 positions to fill and I really need to fill these with great, great people, but those people don't exist in my organization. Right. I'm not moving them from within, I'm getting them from outside. Yes.

Sam Palazzolo:
Certainly. You know, and at certain levels in an organization promote from within is always the best policy. So, we see that time. And again, being something that organizations typically don't do really well. I mean, you know, one of the organizations that we worked with, I asked what is your promotion policy? And one of the leaders quit back, screw up, move up. In other words, if you screw up, that tends to be the thing that gets you recognition. And while in most organizations, it might be recognized negatively in our organization. It's recognized positively, we're going to give you a promotion. It was one of those things where it took a hot second to be able to sit back and go, okay, if that's the culture that we're attempting to get our arms around here, how do we harness that? They by the way you talked about entrepreneurs, they ended up creating one of the better innovation labs of all the organizations that we worked with, primarily because they had people who were without fault or fear able go out, put themselves in tremendously uncomfortable positions and see what happens. And it was a big spaghetti throwing at a wall contest, but they just didn't have that culture that led them to perceive that, you know, if I make a mistake, I'm going to be I'm out of here on the next train. It wasn't that way at this organization at all.

Greg Voisen:
Rusty Gillibrand was on about his book called Breaking the Code. Now Rusty's pretty unusual guy, always top of his class, the, a student and most of these organizations are looking for the AA students. They're looking for the Magna Laude guys. They're looking for those kinds of people. Rusty was the worldwide finance director for apple for many, many years, and went in and said, Hey, I'm basically not going to do that anymore. And when he got demoted, because they wanted to put him up, he says, you're taking up too much of my time. And I'm taking away from my family. And as it ended out, he ended up divorcing his wife and all kinds of other things happen in the process. But he became a transformational coach. Now, what I found very interesting, a worldwide finance director for apple computer worked his way up all the way through those ranks to get to that level tells him, Nope, no more promotion, because now you want me to work at night and we contact people in China and be all over the place and I'm never going to be at home. How do you help people find that balance? Sam, what is the, the magic elixir where somebody like that, who they lost, which was a big loss basically says Sayonara what are you telling people about balancing their life and the companies helping the people balance?

Sam Palazzolo:
You know, I think it's one of those situations where when it comes to leadership is a chair that very rarely gets sit empty for any length of time. In other words, there's always willing to someone to come and want to sit into it. Not that leadership is a game of musical chairs either, but it's relatively easy to find folks who want to escalate in their career. They might not be the best choice, but typically we find in organizations, there's not a difficult moment to try to have people scale up to that leadership chair. What's, what's interesting though, in the story that you had talked about, we ran into this with one of our client organizations as well, where they had a senior sales leader. The gentlemen were, you know, he was promoted to the position. He was good with working with other people, but he was fantastic at selling and the vacuum that he left when he was promoted, there, there was no backfill for, I mean, they needed to have at least five people do what this one individual did before the leader who was promoted.

Also, he was miserable while he loved selling. He hated selling people to sell. If that was the way he put it, you know, he needed the coaching and the, just the, the labor involved with being a leader he didn't enjoy. And it was one of those things where it takes a really special leader to recognize within their organization when they do promote people that if it's not working for those folks, you've got to allow them the opportunity to graciously go back and perform at the level that they were at before. It's not one of those things from a leadership, you know, escalation trying to get people into a leadership role. And then once you're there, you've got to prove yourself at that level.

Greg Voisen:
I like what you said, but what Rusty told me is he did go back and it was a dead end job. Now, while that was the case, you know, reality is like, you're promoted, worldwide finance director. You have all these other commitments, but by the way, it's too much of a demand on my personal life. I want to go back to where I was. I go back to where I am and you realize, I can't imagine myself walking in this door every day, doing the same thing that I was doing. And there's got to be something more to life. So, you quit, and you leave an empty void in a leadership position and you go become a transformational coach. Which many of the people at apple said to him, Hey, we're really interested. Half of them. He said, thought he was absolutely crazy to give up such a prestigious job. You know, the reality is, is that we have this trajectory in life. And I want you to go through this because you are you numerated strategy, execution, cashflow, and people as four dimensions of business transformation, excellence, and leadership under-performance in any of these dimensions could be problematic. We're just talking about under-performance in any of them. What recommendations do you have to avoid that underperformance in any of those areas?

Sam Palazzolo:
Yeah, I, again, I think it's a combination play of a multiple different processes and procedures coming together and people pulling the talents for most of the organizations that we work with. You know, what it really comes down to is their ability to find those business transformation moments, the things that they're doing well. And to scale those up even more rapidly, what we found is that, and you hit on the people element. You know, we had an organization who would tell us to our face. People are our most important asset and that's a cliche and that's something that they probably read somewhere, or maybe they went to one of those great consulting groups to help them create that type of a mission, vision value statement and how it is that they should operate. So what we typically find is that there's not a great impetus put if they say that within the people's, for example, either from a hiring perspective up front, within the people entree path into the organization, maybe they're looking and excluding out some really quality folks you were talking about A-plus talent.

Every organization wants a plus talent. I'm not saying that you need to scale back to see talent, but there's probably some people who maybe they don't test. Well, maybe they, instead of going to the best universities, have some great experiences or maybe yet get this, they have the desire. It's the college graduate experience time. And again, where they can't get the job because they don't have the experience, but they can't get the experience because they don't have the job. It's a doubt dog, chase, tail, tail chase, dog moment. Right? The other thing though, is that once you have that, those people assets onboarded into the organization, we could talk for hours about the onboarding and what's effective versus ineffective. It's how do you keep them and how do you get them to really perform at peak performance levels? We typically, and through, through any number of different assessments that we might work with the organization, we find that potential can be really high, but we're performances is usually subservient to that potential level. It's how do you close that gap in between potential and performance? That's where we spend a lot of time with the leaders that we work with.

Greg Voisen:
That's really, that's very good. And it's a good point that you make is closing the gap. And I think there are many gaps. You know, you presented a three-stage slash step approach to business transformation that can lead to success. Can you share those steps with the audience and maybe elaborate on that a little bit more? Yeah,

Sam Palazzolo:
Sure do. And I know we'll put it in the show notes because this business transformation approach, we have a one-page overview on it for us, it comes down to, you've got to be able to see you've then got to be able to do. And then you've got to ensure that what you're seeing and doing is delivering the results you want. So, see, do deliver. Those are our three steps to business transformation.

Greg Voisen:
Awesome. Now, so as a leader, transformative communication, we just talked about the breakdown in communication, and we see this happening all over. When communication breaks down, it costs companies lots of money and you were talking about human capital, and it also really messes with the performance level of people. And meaning, you know, if you're looking for, for porn for performance here, it's usually way down here when we have bad communication. Communication is probably the most powerful tool. I just had Maryanne O'Brian on called the elevated communicator assignment, and she used her book. Great, great book. Can you help tell us what kind of strategies you would implement to help people become better listeners and better communicators within the organization?

Sam Palazzolo:
I look at communication as one of those projects that it probably is the most often overlooked portion of any project. In other words, we'll spend hours in a wardroom writing on every white board and even non whiteboard insight regarding what the process and the procedures should look like. We have at times helped clients put together what were artful. I mean, they were almost Shakespearian action plans. What it was we were going to do, who was going to do them and by when the, the ultimate action plans, but the thing that most organizations don't spend a lot of time is figuring out what's our communication channel going to be. It's one of Kotter's original eight steps in his change management group from Harvard and the communication channel should be looked at just like a process or procedure should be looked at the tip though, is that it just because you come out with what the communication plan should be, it also means that you've got to build some variability into it. So, in other words, some contingency plans, if you can, future forecast what it is that is going to be said, and most importantly, how it's going to be heard and then provide almost a series of frequently asked questions in advance of that, build out your contingencies. Those are the key steps to having effective communication and organization.

Greg Voisen:
Yeah. Everybody in communication, Sam usually is looking at the now you know, it's, it's what happened immediately. Now let's address it because pants are on fire because now, we have to come up with a solution for it. And you see this happen time and time again. And I love the fact that you looked into the future and look for the contingencies. That's really important. Now I mentioned this once before, and I won't mention any more than this because you know, COVID-19 Delta, variant, whatever you want. We've obviously had lots of changes. And I just had April Rennie on here for her book called flux, the eight superpowers to thrive doing constant change. There can't be a time where we've seen more change than what we've seen is you and I in my lifetime, I'm 67 to actually see, you know, huge changes in business. What tips can you share with the leaders to get started on business transformation? And I'm not even going to say in a post pandemic situation here because none of us really knows where this is all going, but the reality is it's starting to look a lot better. Let's just say that.

Sam Palazzolo:
Yup. I think that there's a great Lennon quote, not John Lennon, but Lennon from Marxist, correct. Who said there are decades where nothing occurs in weeks where decades occur something to that effect. And that's really what the pandemic has caused. I mean, there's, there's a massive acceleration and what it is and how it is that people behaved, you know, for, for us, we tend to break down business transformation, along six different variables. We talked about people that are one of those variables. There's another one though that has to do with owning the change yesterday, we did a workshop with a client. And one of the things that we worked on was how is it that they can put together their best strategies for moving forward? And the concept that I'll share with you and with your listeners, Greg, is termed future foresight. We know that hindsight is perfect, 20, 20 clarities.

And what if you could, as a leader have that same type of 2020 vision not looking back forward, but instead looking forward. Right? Correct. And that's the challenge that we put out there. And that's what the organization is looking for leaders to do. It's one of the keys to creating successful business transformation. You know, we talked a lot about communication today and describing where it is that you want to go. It's not necessarily selling the dream as much as it is sharing the dream and the vision that the leader has, but it is one of those things where that type of future foresight, that 20, 20 clarity of vision and the be able to communicate effectively with where it is that you're going. That's another one of the keys that we've found in helping businesses transform for the better.

Greg Voisen:
Well, and I, and I'm going to use this analogy again, because the looking at the book, but, you know, the reality is this rogue wave, they come up and you can either ride the top of it or your ship can sink, right? And the reality is identifying the factors that could have an effect, whether it's digital technology or it's a transformation in this area, or it's something that's going to actually impact your business. Now you're, you know, tip of the spear is all about transforming businesses, which means addressing a wide variety of topics. And a lot of them very challenging to, to put your hands around, you know, people are listening to this podcast and they're going, wow, these guys have talked about a lot. If you were going to leave our listeners with two points and from a consultant standpoint and they're business owners are, they’re all entrepreneurs.

And I don't care what size business it is, because most of the advice you give can apply to almost any size business of a listener out there today. What would you say from all the books you've written, all the courses you've taught, all the philanthropy work you've done given the current state of the economy and the pandemic is getting better and where we're all heading. What advice would you have for the person right now, sitting there going, wow, this has been a great podcast. I learned a lot, but what can I apply today? What can I take away that Sam can tell me that I could actually take some action? You know, action is a sign of intelligence, right?

Sam Palazzolo:
No, I I'll go back to, I'll go back to some of the work that we did when I was with Toyota Lexus. We did some work with Marcus Buckingham of the Gallup group. This was right around the time that mark was launching the strength finder assessment. And Marcus had something very interesting to say about strengths versus weaknesses, because we always perceive that, you know, if you try, try, try, you'll, you'll be able to eventually do, do, do, and you'll win win-win. Marcus, his perception was that you should focus solely on your strengths if you do, and your weaknesses become irrelevant. In other words, the little train that could, it should stay in the Depot. And if trains, what trains do best is they haul heavy loads. That should be left up to real big trains, real big engines, right? Not little trains that could so focus on your strengths, your weaknesses will become irrelevant.

That's the number one thing that I would say the second point though, Greg, is that you've got to figure out a way to measure, manage, and hold yourself accountable for the people that are disciplined out there. And I'm super fortunate. I have worked with a lot of us Navy seals and I've worked with some special forces, green Berets in the army. These are some of the best discipline people on the planet, but even they need help from an external source to help keep them on track. So, they achieve on target on time results, this dashboard, or the metrics, or the KPIs, not only identifying the criteria that you're going to hold yourself accountable to achieving, but having a third party, an external force, somebody that's not in between the six inches that make up your mind hold you accountable towards achieving those. That's where the magic tends to really take root. So those are the two points that I would say, focus on your strengths. Also identify those key metrics, have somebody help hold you accountable toward achieving that.

Greg Voisen:
And again, that comes back down to goals and proximal goals because the way you get there is by the small steps to achieve the bigger goal. I don't care if you're an Olympic athlete or what you are. You have to focus your time on what's important. And I think focusing out all the other bombardment of stuff that comes at us is probably the most challenging. You know, whether it's BJ Fogg with tiny habits, a new habit you're going to do, or James clear with atomic habits or whatever it might be. The reality is it's about changing a process in your life that will transform you and to get you to that area of what you really want. And then the key is knowing what the hell it is really want. I think a lot of us go through life, not really knowing, and you know that in itself, finding a purpose and saying, Hey, this is my life purpose, right?

It's not just my purpose today. This is something that I want to do the rest of my life. A lot of people never get there and their whole lifetime. But you bring up some very important points. And for my listeners, you know you need to go to the tip of the spear and, and you need to check out his website. There are some great blog entries there. You can learn about his advisory services. And I'm an encourage you because we're going to put a link this free 2021 report plus the 37-page assessment we'll have links to both of those, but this is a good way to get with them and then reach out. I hit the contact button reach out to Sam. He's there for you. No matter what size business you are, I'm sure he's the kind of guy who would be willing to take your call.

Sam Palazzolo:
Well, thank you so much, Greg. Thanks for having me. My mother, my mother told me one time that one of my cousins was having a difficult time reaching me. And I said, mom, I don't know how that can be. I just had a conversation with the gentleman who was in internationally. He was overseas in Australia and he found my phone number on our website. If you can't find it, there's probably an issue I said, so I'm not so certain how hard our cousin tried to get ahold of Sam, but I know that I'm a pretty public person, so I can, and I also operate from one of those mentalities, which you do. I know as well, Greg and I love it. It's the, if I can help, I will. If I can't, I probably know someone who can, so I'm a helper and a giver by nature, please outreach.

Greg Voisen:
Well, thank you, Sam. Namasay to you, thank you for being on inside personal growth and sharing some of your business expertise and knowledge as well as the transference of that. So, people can actually talk with you, set up a time for a consult and get together with you. Thanks so much.

Sam Palazzolo:
No, thank you, Greg.

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