Podcast 930: Inner Wealth: How Wellness Heals, Nurtures, and Optimizes Ultra-Successful People with Julie Wald

If you are looking for a comprehensive guide to wellness then you might want to check out “Inner Wealth: How Wellness Heals, Nurtures, and Optimizes Ultra-Successful People” by author Julie Wald.  In my recent interview with Julie, we speak about framework for integrating the most impactful wellness practices into your life in a way that feels natural and doable for your busy schedule.

Julie is all you need to motivate, encourage, guide and support you on your wellness journey.  If you want to learn more about the practices of meditation please click here to be directed to Julies’s website.  Enjoy this great interview with author Julie Wald.

Thanks for listening!

THE BOOK

With Inner Wealth, that’s what Julie Wald is giving you: a framework for integrating the most impactful wellness practices into your life in a way that feels natural and doable for your busy schedule. Built around the four pillars of wellness—movement, stillness, touch, and nourishment—this book will inspire and enable you to create a self-care plan that meets your needs. This is not a formula or a prescription; it’s a recipe, and you can decide how much of each ingredient you want to add to live a happy, healthy life that is reflective of who you are.

THE AUTHOR

A wellness practitioner for over 25 years Julie Wald, is the Founder, CEO and Chief Wellness Officer at Namaste Wellness. Julie is also the bestselling author of Inner Wealth: How Wellness Heals, Nurtures and Optimizes Ultra-Successful People, released in March of 2020. She holds a master’s degree in Social Work from New York University and began her career in 1995 as a clinical social worker treating adults, children and adolescents in mental health and healthcare settings. In the process of building her impressive mental health practice, Julie also pursued her personal wellness objectives and in doing so became a Certified Yoga Instructor, Meditation Teacher, Thai Bodyworker and Reiki Master. ​

You may also refer to the transcripts below for the full transcription (not edited) of the interview.

Greg Voisen
Welcome back to Inside Personal Growth. This is Greg Voisen, the host of Inside Personal Growth. And joining me from New York is Julie Wald. And Julie has a new book out called Inner Wealth. And the subtitle is How Wellness Heals, Nurtures and Pptimizes Ultra Successful People. Well, good day to you. How are you doing? They're in New York, Julie. And this was a very interesting book. Obviously, you profiling a lot of your clients and their challenges, and how you approached the treatment with them. And then putting this book together, I found it fundamentally very instrumental and actually giving me some great advice as well. So I'm really interested to get into this interview and talk about it further. So you're doing great.

Julie Wald
I am doing well. It's so great to be here, Greg. And thank you for those kind words about the book and really excited to dig into this conversation.

Greg Voisen
Well, great, great. Now, I'm going to tell the listeners that from your website, and for those who are out there listening and you want to know more about Julie, go to Julie Wald and it's www Namaste wellness.com that's one place. You can also find her at Julie Wald wellness.com. That's an another place and she's a wellness practitioner for over 25 years. And the founder and the chief wellness officer at namaste wellness. Julie is also the bestselling author of this book, inner wealth, how wellness heals, nurtures and optimizes ultra-successful people, which was released in March of 2020. She holds a master's degree in social work from New York University and began her career in 95. As a clinical social worker treating adults’ children and adolescents in mental health and healthcare settings. In the process of building are impressive mental health pressing practice, Julie also pursued her personal wellness objectives and in doing so, became a certified yoga instructor, meditation teacher, Thai body worker and Reiki master. So she is well qualified to speak with us about what we're going to be talking about. And, Julie, if you would tell our listeners a little about yourself, I gave him you know, there's, there's more behind your story than just what was on that bio about how you got, where you are. And why this journey toward writing this book, which profiles so many of your clients, their ailments, their stresses their conditions, and at the same time, incorporates into it, how you would approach that with a client, which is I think, is a great way for people to learn.

Julie Wald
Absolutely, absolutely. Thank you so much. So, so yes, my journey has been has been a really interesting one. And, you know, I have had the opportunity to work with some really extraordinary human beings and so many different ways throughout the course of of my career and have learned really, both from my own experiences and my own journey, as well as the work that I've done with with these people. At the at the very beginning of my career when I was a clinical social worker, before I really became so deeply embedded in the wellness and self-care space, I really actually worked with with some of the most disenfranchised people in the country, in New York City. And I learned a lot about the human condition there. I also learned a lot about myself, and some of the things that were most challenging for me, in that chapter of my career, and quite frankly, was handling a lot of my own stress, which is what led me to become so deeply immersed in the World of Wellness, how do I take care of myself? How do I practice self-help, um, you know, as I am in this helping profession, at the time, I was working with everything from, you know, teenagers who were who were suicidal to adults who are coping with, you know, issues of trauma and addiction and poverty. And, you know, it was a lot to hold. And I had to figure out how to get strong enough and have my own resilience toolkit to manage, manage showing up as a professional and moving the needle forward each and every day. And that's when I really dove so deeply into meditation practice and yoga practice and understanding the value of all of these different types of modalities and how they could support my own mental health and well being I'm in that in that helping profession as my, as my own dad used to say, when I was a kid, it's not the weight of the pack on your back, but the strength of the back that carries the pack. And so it was sort of like, my instinct at that point was not to run away from the challenges that I was facing, but to figure out how to get stronger. Interestingly, that led me to a place where I became deeply interested in involved in in these different more Eastern modalities and became trained and traveled the world and develop these sort of secondary specialties to my work as a clinical social worker. And at that point, I developed a bit of a side hustle, I was living in New York City, and I, you know, started working with some of the most high performing professionals in the world, this was just post 911. So this goes way back. And it was, you know, a time when particularly people in finance, but people certainly all over New York, and all over the country were, we're in a bit of crisis after the trauma of this event. And there was an opening, there was a window opened, where people became more open to some of these integrative practices to make their own back stronger, just like I had to make my back stronger during those challenging times. And again, that's when I started working with some high performers, and learning what, what their challenges were and supporting them much as I had supported myself, in figuring out how to cultivate well-being build resilience, find greater balance in their lives.

Greg Voisen
When you talk about that juxtaposition of working with just impoverished people and people with challenges, and the energy that you have to hold, but at the same time, the energy that somebody who is on the opposite side of the coin brings into the room, who's a high producer, maximum stress, all the kinds of things that you've profiled by a lot of people that they came to you trying to find in inner way trying to find a more peaceful way. And I think with that, I think self-care is one of the biggest areas in at least it's one you address. And I think it's important. Because in both cases, whether it's the very wealthy who are stressed, or the people who are a little more impoverished, are having mental health issues, are dealing with self-care. And it begins with the step into power, cultivating compassion relationship with others, and make the rules for our own life, right? Because a lot of times, people are letting outsiders control them. They're trying to look better in somebody else's eyes. It isn't exactly what maybe they want. But it's something that somebody else has wanted in their subconscious. They haven't figured out how to live it. How would you advise our listeners about beginning with self-care? And when they could, like, just be enough for themselves? And say, It's okay. Because this is a huge challenge in our society today.

Julie Wald
Absolutely, you know, I think first and foremost, it's about taking some inventory, being conscious of where we are with regard to our self-care, and where some of our areas are opportunities for improvement. And we like to use or I like to use what we call at my company, which, you know, for 25 years, we were namaste wellness, actually, just literally, super recently since our last conversation we've changed our name to Golden, but that's for another conversation. All the URLs that you mentioned at the beginning still lead you to all the right places. But what we do at Golden is looking at the four pillars, which are movement, stillness, connection, and nourishment. These are the basic fundamentals that help human beings thrive and believe it or not, you know, so often people think that they're taking care of themselves because they're going on their peloton for an hour a day, which is wonderful, or, you know, because they're eating tons of kale and avocados or whatever else they're eating, you know, however, there's blind spots, either the connection in their life is less than fulfilling or they aren't finding enough time to slow down to restore to recover. That's their stillness. And what we know is that, you know, if you've ever taken care of a baby, you know that A baby needs plenty of tummy time, that's their movement, they need plenty of sleep, that's their stillness, they need to be held skin to skin they need to be taught to, that's their connection. And they need to be nourished with healthy whole foods. And if all of those things are happening, barring any other major developmental or physical illnesses or delays, the baby will thrive. And us as grown-ups are really just big babies. And so often, we think we can get away with not sleeping or not eating a certain way or, you know, filling up on junk food connection, like just social media type of connection, that we don't realize why we're so cranky, just like a baby would be angry, I then angry.

Greg Voisen
It's just the nurturing of our own soul. And I think frequently, you know, the ego, and, you know, the subconscious and conscious mind, have to learn to live in alignment. And the challenge there is one is there to protect us and the other is there to help us have what we want in life. And I think that's always a challenge. And you know, you told a great story about one of your clients, Michael Copeland, who was realizing that he was not at Lambertus age, I think he was in his 50s. And yet, here's this guy that was doing marathons triathlons, you know, he was very active. And he wanted to have more fun as well, because it's one thing, it's, this is what we're talking about here. It's one thing to be great physically fit, get on your peloton, do what you're going to do. But are you having fun doing what you're doing? And so you brought to him other ways to move? Obviously Yoga, you know, you we can get into a lot of these things. But how did you help Michael realize his optimal wife, and do embrace other ways of being? Okay with Michael, instead of just kind of, you know, beating himself up physically?

Julie Wald
Yeah, that's a great, great question. And, you know, I think one of the things you touched on just early in that question was, was sort of access to joy, right, that, that this concept of people checking a lot of boxes, and, you know, their nervous systems being used to kind of operating in a certain way, where, you know, oftentimes it's doo doo, doo, doo, doo, go, go, go, go go achieve, achieve, achieve. And, you know, it's, it's checking things off the list, it's kind of, you know, staying on that same exact track that they've been on for many, many, many, many years. And so often, when I work with people like Michael and other clients, even just right now, it's this question comes up is that, you know, where what is really happiness? What is what is joy, actually, how, you know, in these are, these are some people that if you look at their lives from the outside, and you think, wow, they've really got it all going on there, you know, they're there, they must be the happiest person in the world based on what they've achieved and what they have and how they look. And what you realize is, is that, you know, that ability to access joy comes from a lot of different places, but one of those places is actually sort of learning to recognize some of the patterns that are on autopilot and being willing to put ourselves in new situations to develop a curiosity about, you know, how would it feel if I actually skipped a day of running this week and did something slower like yoga or breathing instead or, you know, decided that you know, I was going to I was going to, to basically give myself permission to try things a different way and see what the ripple effect might be of that. But in order to even get there, I think it's first about supporting people in gaining the awareness around the autopilot nature of how they're operating and where that tunnel vision or those are those blinders are happening, and really limiting their access to, to new experiences to experience a fuller holer expression of themselves.

Greg Voisen
Yeah, they just need to know that it's accessible. And you know, I think once they try it, they find so much more peace in it. So I'm just going to say, you know, like yoga or just walking, walking in the woods, you know, or walking along the beach or doing things like that, because you talked about reflection, you know, and Julian mentioned this question because I had the pleasure and honor to sit in George Leonard's living room and do an interview with him. And he and Michael Murphy are the founders of epsilon. And along with Michael Murphy, in Big Sur, George founded something called i t p, which stands for integral transformative practice. And you may or may not have heard of this, maybe you have. But it was a practice of Aikido yoga, movement, meditation, and meditation. Right. And I was like, I attended a class. And they were only 4550 minutes, I think it was, but it was the combination of the movement of the body, the yoga, the meditation, which really shifted my stance, and it seems to me a few, you have a similar kind of practice for clients? And could you comment on the benefits of putting all of these practices kind of together? whatever they, whatever they are, that you do? Because I noticed from the book, that it is this, I want to call smarters BORG of opportunities, right? Maybe, maybe that's a bad way to put it. But that's the way it seems to me.

Julie Wald
Absolutely, absolutely. And I think, um, but I think it's really and I think the reason it's a swarm sport is because it's about meeting people where they are, and I don't actually believe in sort of a one size fits all formula for wellbeing, I think different expressions of the practice of different of a, basically a conscious, breath based movement practice, can resonate with different people at different times for different reasons. And so whether that, as you mentioned, is, you know, a really rigorous yoga asana practice, a physical practice, or whether that's a really quiet, still gentle, you know, Yin based or restorative practice, depending on where somebody's energy is out of alignment, it will really impact kind of what is going to be the best prescription yoga wise, for example, for them, right? Not one kind of yoga is best for all people, it really depends on what they need to cultivate, do they need to, you know, find more flexibility? And is that the emphasis on a physical level? Do they need to, you know, find more quiet, more stillness? And is that is that really where we need to prioritize, you know, the fruits of the practice. Of course, you know, breathing and mindfulness are sort of integrative aspects of yoga. And, again, kind of thinking about the four pillars, one of the amazing things about a yoga based practice is that it brings together almost all of the pillars, right, so you have movement, you have nourishment, which the breath in and of itself is the most sort of nourishing ingredient. It's what we need to nourish ourselves to stay alive, you have connection, because you're really connecting with yourself, and you have stillness because it's a focused, meditative practice. And so, you know, one of the things I love so much about practices that kind of fall into that general category is that they actually encompass all four pillars. And that's, that's a powerful thing. One other just quick thing I want to mention is that, you know, back to the beginning of our conversation, when I was talking about these, you know, disenfranchised New Yorkers who are struggling, and then working with these kind of ultra successful people. I was doing that at the same time. And one was more of a side hustle at the time. And one was kind of my main, my main job. And one of the things that I noticed, going back to that idea of the human condition is that actually, despite kind of the fancy apartments, or the clothes that people were wearing, their struggles were the same. And in many cases, there are solutions were also the same. And these prescriptive formulas like the one that ones that we're talking about, were beautiful fitting practices, regardless of who that person was in sort of that whole social stratosphere.
Greg Voisen
.It's interesting that you say that because, you know, from both sides of the spectrum, you saw similarities. And, you know, people out there might not think that and I and you had a story in the book, which I thought was really Interesting, you're working with an entrepreneur. His name was Joshua Gould. And who was struggling enormously with unplugging. And you said, unplugging. And this story is not uncommon in this always on world that we're living in today. It I see it, it's a dis ease. You know, it really is, what prescription would you give to our listeners like Joshua, who are listening right now, to unwind and reduce the stressors, because many people are so unconscious, of what's creating it, it just builds up during the day. And before they know it, they're angry at something or they're frustrated, or another email comes in, that they've got to deal with. It's not something they want to do, or they've got to go to a meeting or whatever it might be. Julie, it is there. So I'd love to see what your prescription might be for all of those listeners, not just Josh.

Julie Wald
Yes, well, I'm glad you mentioned unplugging. Because I think that finding time to disconnect from our digital lives is an incredibly important variable when it comes to self care. And when it comes to managing stress. And I think that's much easier said than done, because these devices are highly, highly addictive. And, you know, I don't think I think it's important that we actually don't blame ourselves for how hooked in we are, because they're literally designed to kind of capture our brains in this way. And, and, but what I do think is important is finding ways to be intentional, whether it's deciding to plug the phone in, you know, during dinner time, and afterwards, to create an evening that is, is less plugged into technology, but But that's really just the first step. It's, it's, um, then replacing that technology with other activities, kind of pulling from the four pillars, whether it's taking an evening walk with someone that we care about, or even something as simple as watching an amazing movie can be very nourishing can be very fulfilling. And so. But that constant interaction digitally, is very, very agitating to the stressed out mind to the already stressed out mind. And if we can give ourselves some recovery time, if we can give ourselves some downtime, then we're really able to reset, it's the other half of all of the doing of all of the talking and all of the engaging, is that spaciousness is that quiet time, whatever that looks like, for, for that person for you. It's really where can you find moments to, to refill your tank, and most likely those opportunities will come when you close your laptop, put down your phone, and do something that involves movement. True stillness, which is things like reading a book, scrolling, scrolling Instagram, from bed is not stillness, right? That's a very sort of activated place to be in the mind, it's actually really agitated. And so you know, reading an old fashioned book, taking a walk, all of these things can even taking a walk can beat stillness. So you know, in some ways,

Greg Voisen
well, I think frequently, we are doing beings, and we're doing less being than we are doing. And unfortunately, that is the disease because it has proliferate peripheral ated people's lives. And they don't even realize it. You know, because if you were to look today, at almost maybe anybody's phone, the number of apps that are on the phone, the actual numbers of apps that focus on to do list, you know, and I'm not going to name them, but there's hundreds of them. And it's not that we are going to eliminate that in our life. We're going to try and block time for that and block time for other things. And I think that's a really important thing to say, Hey, I know what I need to be productive, and I know when I can unplug. And I think for any busy executive who's really good at what they're doing, they're either doing time blocking, and they're saying, Hey, I'm taking the time to do this, and then I'm taking time for my yoga, and they're fitting it in the day, you know, and in your chat. You're on reflection, you speak about awareness of patterns. And you mentioned that earlier as well. And I think that's really important. Because if people realize there was a camera following them every day for 24 hours, the question I might have is do when we replayed it, would you like what you saw? Would you like what the camera captured, the things you did during the day. And these patterns, they create stress in our lives, and they can be done to shift our body's response, or I say what can be done to shift the body's response by using breathwork and slow mindful yoga to gain more balance, and why in your estimation is breathing so important to become aware, to shift to shift our awareness breathing, to shift our awareness?

Julie Wald
Absolutely. Breathing just forces us to slow down to land in the moment to land in our body to kind of get out of that autopilot mode, and turn the gaze in for just a moment and feel and experience where we are in time and space and emotion in any given any given moment. And, and I think that, that's when we have that moment of pause before we then continue on that, you know, hamster wheel of whatever it is that we are doing, or reacting to or overdoing. I think that that it's, it's that it's the other half, quite frankly, of all of the doing is the stopping and the breathing and the processing. And it's not, it's not that doing is bad. In fact, doing is great. We need to do things that's part of why, you know, we're put on this planet, but there is such thing as too much of a good thing. And well, let's

Greg Voisen
face it, very few of us are going to go to India and become a yogi and go into a cave and sit there for years and meditate. I'm talking years, many of them. That's fraught and we're probably most of us not going to end up in an ashram. And we might go for a while, but we're not going to spend a lot of time. So we have to create our own ashrams, you know, in our own homes. And I think that's what you do really well, your wellness program, and golden in what you're teaching pieces and people is, you know, you have had some phenomenal teachers along the way. You know, you work with Jon Kabat Zinn and Sharon Salzberg What I would like for you to do though, is speak with us about the benefits of gratitude and journaling. And why someone listening who, you know, wants to start why somebody listening would want to start a regular practice of these two, what you refer to in the book, healthy exercises, to benefit them emotionally and mentally. I know a lot of people say, Well, I'm going to do it, they get the journal, and then none of the pages ever get filled. And I'm as much culprit on that one, myself. Right. I do have a gratitude practice. But it's, it's more of a movement practice before I get out of bed. It's what I it's what I do and what I say to myself, and what my subconscious is being reprogrammed to every day. But I've been horrible about the journal entries. So what would you tell people about just journaling? And gratitude practice?

Julie Wald
Absolutely. First of all, you know, these are really, really, really fundamental, powerful practices, I will again reiterate that it's not a one size fits all. And so, you know, Greg, it sounds like you have an amazing practice in the morning of, of movement and sort of resetting your consciousness and dropping into gratitude. And, and if that's working for you, then you know, I think feeling really good about continuing on that on that trajectory. I, I know that, you know, when we take a moment to practice gratitude, it really helps us drop out of story drop out of our storyline, about, you know, all of the things that we're so worried about or that that aren't going the way that we want or that we feel like we need to get control over. It's a very centering, grounding, practice, even if it's something that's very A small like being grateful for a warm, delicious cup of coffee in the morning, right? Those are grounding moments to just bring us out of the whirlwind of whatever the storyline in our minds are. And when we journal about it, there's something very powerful about writing, it's part of what helps to repattern the brain and help develop pathways in the brain where we, we start to actually naturally think and respond to the world along those lines of feeling grateful of seeing things through that lens. And it's, um, it's, it just creates almost like a multisensory practice around gratitude that that impacts every aspect of of our being. Now, you know, it is all lovely sounding, and it is easier said than done. And usually with my clients, what we talk a lot about is really, really small, consistent behaviors, right? So what can you commit to on a daily basis, that is really too small to even be able to have an excuse, like, what have you just tell yourself that every single morning, I call it the first thought, best thought practice, you know, every single morning, the first thing that you're going to do, is just think momentarily about what you're grateful for, and you train yourself that the cue of, for example, your alarm clock, is that reminder of, oh, I'm thinking about what I'm grateful for right now, because my alarm just went off. And that's the pattern, that's the habit that I want to create, maybe before you go to bed. It's, I write one sentence of, you know, something that I had an insight on today, or reflection or something that I'm grateful for. And, and, and starting really small, and being incredibly consistent, is exponentially more powerful than, you know, doing something for an hour once in a while. It's just, it's the only way to start to incorporate some of these practices in a life changing way. In my experience,

Greg Voisen
well, and I would agree with you, and you know, the whole concept of tiny habits, you know, the gentleman from Stanford's been, I'm trying to remember his name. He's been on here and James clear as well, right? So, you know, when you look at it, it's finding things that you're excited about doing. And I like what you said there. Because, you know, when you got man who came in, who was, I wouldn't say beating himself up, but doing the triathlons and was having a difficult time finding more mobility in his life. You know, you gave him a simple practice of meditation that he may not have explored on his own, he might have kept down the same path, to make him more limber, but more importantly, the breathing. The breathing part of that to actually recenter yourself and leave a meditation practice. Like, I'm going to say this, like you're on cloud nine. It's kind of like, when when I leave meditation, it's like it's a whole new, Greg. And the question is, is how long can you carry that during the day? And keep yourself centered? And you know, I mentioned a minute ago, your wonderful mentors and teachers, many who have been on the show, Jon Kabat Zinn, Jack Kornfield, Sharon Salzberg, what are some of the things that you learn from them that you've brought forward into your own practice, and are now transforming helping your clients transform by using it in their practice?

Julie Wald
Hmm, I think so many of the teachers that I have learned so much from and so many amazing teachers through the years, there's something very simple about their approach and their ideas and their understanding. And it's really just kind of the returning again and again and again to the simple ideas and concepts about, you know, being present, finding the wherewithal to be responsive, instead of reactive to find small ways to love and support ourselves and how that's the beginning of really being able to be a compassionate, you know, human citizen on this planet. And these these very, very, very clear and simple ideas that when we when we just that it all basically ends up going back to those concepts again and again and again. So when somebody comes to me when a client comes to me in a very worked up or complicated place, or you know it all, and I start to feel my own overwhelmed because as, as a coach, as a psychotherapist, you know, one of the tools that we use the sort of the way that we feel when we're with a client, and if I'm working with somebody who's really intense, or really type A, or really overwhelmed, I can feel that in my body. And, you know, the way that I work with myself and in grounding myself and trying to kind of see the simple truths. The simple ideas that are going to be the guiding principle and helping this individual back to a state of equilibrium always seems to be kind of the light through the tunnel, so to speak.

Greg Voisen
Well, I think as your background as a therapist and your background, as a teacher in this, I'm going to call it inner work. It's so valuable for people to, to experience to experience it in any way, whether it's through yoga, or breathwork, or tai chi, or anything that you're doing that you're helping them with or just counseling, just the initial counseling part of it. Because it and this is my next question, you say that all mental, emotional and physical patterning from our lives is stored in the cells of our body, I agree, contributing to the tension that we feel in our neck or in our John, the tightness in our lower back, or the pain that we feel in our knees or wherever that pain may be manifesting, because it does manifest throughout. And I find that, you know, because you've done plenty of work with this in the chakras. But if people are doing meditation properly, and they're bringing it back in, they're realigning those energies in their chakras, what kinds of body work and or massage do you recommend to move this stuck energy because when this energy gets stuck in you, you're a Reiki Master Reiki Masters are the best at moving energy can be so talk with our listeners about that with a minute and then we'll wrap up our podcast.

Julie Wald
Beautiful I love Well obviously I think Reiki and other types of energy work as well I know there's some some different expressions of of similar types of energy work, I think that this is something that can be done alone or integrated into massage therapy. I love acupressure, I love shiatsu and love Thai bodywork, which is sort of a different. A different type of you know, is otherwise known as lazy person's yoga. So it's, it's really some moving some of the gross muscles around in getting mobility in the joints, which I think can depending on the person feel really, really, really supportive and sometimes is necessary before we get to some of the subtler practices. You know, I think that it's so individualized depending on what somebody might be struggling with, right. So there have been times where, you know, things like lymphatic drainage or deep tissue massage, or sports massage are really the most important places to begin because of what's sort of happening and manifesting in a very obvious way the physical body and again, kind of once we work through some of those physical issues, we can start to peel off the layers of the onion and work in a more energetic fashion with things like as I mentioned, she ought to and acupressure and Reiki and I also am a huge fan and used to do a lot of this very early on in my career is really work with guided visualization, and helping people use their own minds to start to clear out some of the blockages particularly in the chakra system.

Greg Voisen
Well, very powerful guided visualization in conjunction with affirmations that I'm a strong believer in and whether you journal Are you don't like I'm not. The reality is if you were going to use journaling, and I remember from my course at USM and spiritual psychology, one of the most powerful things I think I ever did was write in the journal the things in my life that were very painful, and then burn it. Actually stick it in the fire. And it was the act of actually releasing that I think people talk about losing weight. But then we also talk about releasing weight. Releasing means we're, we're saying it's not coming back, losing it, to get means to me that it could come back again. But actually, those words are very powerful. And I think when you write words in a journal, and then you either burn them or get rid of them, however you do it, but burning, believe me, it works throughout the fireplace. So Julie, if you were to leave the listeners with three actionable ideas that could work immediately, because I always like to give people like, okay, immediate benefit here from our podcast, would that would help them to be at a greater peace and have more self care with themselves? What are you going to say are going to be the three things that they could actually do? Leaving this podcast and go, Okay, I can apply this today. One small step, for me in self care.

Julie Wald
Absolutely. So these are just three Fun, fun tips. And hopefully, one will be resonant, I think, setting a timer on your phone or your computer throughout the course of the day and random times. And when that timer goes off, using that as an opportunity to just take three full, complete breaths, to close your eyes, to stop looking at your screen, and to just pause for a moment to dial your awareness into your body, to give yourself those reminders throughout the day to Take three breaths, if you're resistant to that. That's, that's, that's diagnostics, so to speak. And we know that if the idea of taking three deep breaths is way too much for you to handle. That's good information to have about where we need to support you,

Greg Voisen
or those of you who are watching on YouTube, because many just listen, some watch. I closed my eyes and I took three deep breaths. And her practice. I know it sounds so simple. But it's so centering to just do that to recognize breath. So I'd say that's a great tip. Right there. Number one little things,

Julie Wald
little things can make the hugest differences and people think that just isn't worth it if it's just so small, and it's the most important number. Yeah, number two is to find a buffer between your phone and your bed. Figure out what does that look like is that you don't bring it you buy an old fashioned alarm clock from Amazon. And that's what you use to wake up in the morning. Do you literally give yourself you know, a digital sunset and put your phone to sleep at a certain time of the night and do other things. Even if it's 10 minutes before you go to bed that you decide I'm going to do something else. Figure out what that is for you right now what's progress, even if it's a baby step, that's okay, to just create a little more sacredness in your sleep routine in your bedtime routine, that it's a private time, it's a quiet time, and how can you create that energy. And lastly, I would say find something that feels nourishing to you that's not food, whether it's an amazing song that you love to listen to, that just fills your whole being, whether it's going out into the park or into your backyard or somehow connecting with nature, figure out how you can fill yourself up in ways that have nothing to do with food, not because you necessarily need to release weight, so to speak. But because nourishment is much more than just food.

Greg Voisen
So those are three great things that people were listening are still listening. And you take them away and you apply them. That would be easy for you to do every day. And I think it's Pharrell Williams happiness on when we hang up here. I'm going to go to Amazon music, I'm going to turn it off. Because that's one of the songs that I love. Hopefully, that's good advice for somebody listening as well. Julie, it's been a pleasure having you on. For all my listeners, we're gonna put a link to her website. We'll put a link to that new website that we'll get from her. But her book is called inner wealth. We've been talking with Julie Wald. And it's how wellness heals, nurtures and optimizes ultra successful people. And let me look at that last part of that. Everybody's successful. It's how you put it in your mind. So this book is for everybody. Thanks so much for being on inside personal growth. Namaste to you. Thank you for everything was a great interview.

Julie Wald
Thank Thank you so much Greg so much fun

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